Search Results

The Index Islamicus consists of the following publications: Index Islamicus Online, the full-text searchable electronic database. Index Islamicus, the annual journal (print edition in 1 yearbook, previously 4 single issues). Index Islamicus Yearbooks , the annual yearbook (print edition available individually or as set). Supplements to the Index Islamicus, specialized bibliographies in print.

The Index Islamicus is the international classified bibliography of publications in European languages on all aspects of Islam and the Muslim world from 1906 onwards until present day. Material cited in the Index Islamicus includes not only work written about the Middle East, but also about the other main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, plus Muslim minorities elsewhere. The Index Islamicus is edited by Gregor Schwarb, Heather Bleaney, Pablo García Suárez and Susan Sinclair.

Presently, Index Islamicus contains over 575,000 records, covering all the main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, as well as Muslims living elsewhere, and their history, beliefs, societies, cultures, languages and literatures. It includes material published by Western scholars in the fields of Humanities and Social Sciences, specialist area- and subject-based areas, and by Muslims writing in European languages. Publications recorded are in the form of articles, books and book chapters. All essays and papers contained in multi-author volumes are recorded, classified and indexed separately.

Periodicals
Over 3,000 journals are surveyed for inclusion in the database, together with conference proceedings, monographs and multi-authored works. Journals and books are indexed down to the article and chapter level. Newspapers, news magazines, and government or official “grey” literature are excluded.

Requests for inclusion of a publication need to be made via this link.

Classification
The well-known Index Islamicus classification scheme, uniquely and carefully geared to the field of Islamic Studies, allows one to quickly find all literature headed under a particular, broader subject area (e.g., Education, Philosophy, Shīʿism, Sudan, Palestine, Israel, as well as their subcategories).

Extensive indexes
Those who prefer more specific queries, have in the print edition at their disposal two elaborate indexes, facilitating quick and effective searches: the subject index guides the user to material on specialised subjects not covered by the classification scheme (e.g. Al-Azhar, mawlids, railways), and also to items relevant to one subject but classified under another. The name index lists not only authors, but also editors, translators, reviewers and personal subjects. So researchers interested in, for instance, Ibn Khaldūn or Muhammad Iqbal or the Ayatollah Khomeini can quickly find publications both by and about them. The online edition offers a full text and advanced search opportunities.

The Editorial Offices are located in the Library, SOAS, University of London, http://www.soas.ac.uk and the Instituto de Lenguas y Culturas del Mediterráneo y Oriente Próximo (CCHS, CSIC) in Madrid, http://www.ilc.csic.es.

Users who would like to bring a missing item to the attention of the editors are invited to send a file with complete metadata in BibTeX, RIS, Zotero RDF, Mendeley or any other commonly used citation format to ixis[at]soas.ac.uk. Inclusion of submissions is at the discretion of the editors.

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pragmatic terms, the combination of various semiotic resources appears to be a way to provide an argumentation that is at the same time context-dependent, or indexical, and context-independent, or general. The present paper reconsiders therefore a typical pragmatic issue, relating to the role played by

In: International Review of Pragmatics
Author: Regine Eckardt
Free indirect discourse presents us with the inner world of protagonists of a story. We seem to see the world through their eyes, and listen to their inner thoughts. The present study analyses the logic of free indirect discourse and offers a framework to represent multiple ways in which words betray the speaker's feelings and attitude. The theory covers tense, aspect, temporal indexicals, modal particles, exclamatives and other expressive elements and their dependence on shifting utterance contexts. It traces the subtle ways in which story texts can offer information about protagonists.

The study of free indirect discourse has been a topic of great interest in recent years in semantics and pragmatics. In this book, Regine Eckardt proposes a new theory of this domain and applies it to a wide variety of phenomena -- discourse particles, exclamatives, and mood -- in addition to the traditional indexical pronouns and tenses. She situates this project within a larger attempt to extend the tools of semantic analysis to fiction. Most formally oriented semanticists have not paid serious attention to this domain, which has resulted in a major gap in semantic theory; this book is thus a pioneering effort and raises many intriguing points. The total result is an empirically rich and exciting work which will be a profitable read for researchers interested in semantics, pragmatics, and formal approaches to literature. Eric McCready, Aoyama Gakuin University