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Padmapani L. Perez, Green Entanglements: Nature Conservation and Indigenous People’s Rights in Indonesia and the Philippines , 2018, Quezon City, University of the Philippines Press, 313 pp., PHP600, ISBN 978-971-542-833-0. Nature conservation efforts and indigenous peoples’ rights have

In: Philippine Political Science Journal
Author: Øyvind Ravna

The Alta case and the Sámi struggle for “rights to lands and waters” put political pressure on the Norwegian government to broadly explore the rights of the indigenous Sámi people to such resources. Both Norway’s ratification of the International Labour Organization (ILO) Convention No. 169 concerning Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries in 1990, and the 2005 Finnmark Act are results of that exploration. To meet the obligations Norway undertook by signing the ILO Convention, the Finnmark Act authorises the Finnmark Commission to investigate land rights held by Sámi and other people in the most central part of Sámi areas in Norway. In March 2012, the Commission submitted its first report, which is the first specific legal clarification of a particular area after 30 years of examinations and discussions of Sámi rights. The report is therefore met with high expectations. This article analyses the main findings of the Commission, including the interpretation of its mandate and thus also Norway’s obligations in regards to the ILO Convention. The article concludes with reflections as to whether the investigation fulfils Norway’s commitments to identify and recognise the lands of the Sámi, both under national and international law.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

compensation their parents and grandparents did not get in the 1950s when the colonial government displaced them from the Zambezi River plains to make way for the Kariba Dam. These activists aligned their claims to prevailing global anti-dam and indigenous people’s rights. This partly explains why some of

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Author: Renzo Baas

was met with a number of repressive state institutions ranging from the police to the courts and ministerial intervention. See Clement Daniels, “The Struggle for Indigenous People’s Rights” in Re-Examining Liberation in Namibia , ed. Henning Melber (Uppsala: Nordic Africa Institute, 2003): 47

In: Matatu

: International Human Rights, Self-Determination and Other Central Provisions, Gáldu Čála / Journal of Indigenous People’s Rights No. 3 (2007) p. 27. 73) Th e Draft Convention, which consists of 51 articles, “contains provisions on Sami land and resource rights, on the Sami Parliaments and the rights to self

In: Nordic Journal of International Law

Populations succeeded in standard setting for some rights, but their draft declaration on indigenous people’s rights still awaits ratification. The most controversial issues 132 NILS BUTENSCHØN AND ANDREAS FØLLESDAL 1 A. Eide, Possible ways and means of facilitating the peaceful and constructive solution of

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

indigenous claims as customary rights over water resources, which is presumed under the provisions of the Indigenous People’s Rights Acts ( IPRA ) and those by state agents (local government in particular) asserting statutory rights under the water code, have been noted in some cases (55). A similar

In: Philippine Political Science Journal
Author: Iva Polak

). Wright’s The Swan Book takes the reader on a circular journey into a near future that takes place after “three centuries of dealing with injustice” ( Wright 2013 : 50), “of denial about original land theft” ( Wright 2013 : 102), some time after “the Indigenous People’s Rights [were] embedded in that

In: Green Matters
Author: Iva Polak

). Wright’s The Swan Book takes the reader on a circular journey into a near future that takes place after “three centuries of dealing with injustice” ( Wright 2013 : 50), “of denial about original land theft” ( Wright 2013 : 102), some time after “the Indigenous People’s Rights [were] embedded in that

In: Green Matters

traditional rights to cover traditional natural resources, to which indigenous people’s rights to resources can then refer. Internal self-determination under Common Article 1 allows more room for the mha to perform its traditional rights in the political, economic and cultural spheres, along with the fpic

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights