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structure of prey communities. Theor. Popul. Biol. 12: 197-229. Holt, R. D. 1984. Spatial heterogeneity, indirect interactions, and the coexistence of prey species. Am. Nat. 124: 377-406. Holt, R. D. 1997. Community modules. In: Gange, A. C., Brown, V. K., eds. Multitrophic Interactions in

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

(NJ) : Princeton University Press . Heimpel GE , Neuhauser C , Hoogendoorn M . 2003 . Effects of parasitoid fecundity and host resistance on indirect interactions among hosts sharing a parasitoid . Ecol. Lett. 6 : 556 – 566 . Holling CS. 1959 . Some characteristics of simple

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

indirect interactions. Keywords : Bystander effects, mother–offspring conflict, socio-sexual behaviour, rhesus ma- caque. 5) Corresponding author’s e-mail address: tmandalaywala@uchicago.edu © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 Behaviour 148, 1137-1155 DOI:10.1163/000579511X596606 Also available online

In: Behaviour
The delicate balance between toleration and repulsion of the Jews, a tiny minority living within the Christian world, stands at the center of studies of religion and society. The development of this difficult relationship on many levels, theological, institutional, and individual, is a matter of continuing relevance in religious history from ancient to contemporary contexts. This volume, written by the leading scholars of Jewish-Christian engagement, seeks to revisit the question in light of new sources and re-readings of older sources. The old view of two implacable enemies battling for their version of truth, of Jews living as insular pariahs within a hostile world, the tale of persecution by the mighty of the weak, has given way to a much more nuanced understanding of areas of congruence, of cultural, economic, and social interchange. The volume examines changes in the Christian posture toward the Jews occurring in a time and place of tremendous cultural and religious creativity in Western European society. It seeks to understand how Jews integrated elements of Christian culture into their own. The volume spans some of the key turning points in the Jewish-Christian relationship and re-examines critical texts, religious disputations, and cultural interactions.
Author: Roy Kareem

The formation of a just environment needs engaged citizens to extend the arc of justice towards other species; education has a specific role in laying out a framework for young people to explore and take ownership of such an agenda. Animals provide a familiar and intimate bridge to take students on this journey – Animal Welfare Education (AWE) promotes the conceptualisation of animals as sentient beings that are of intrinsic value, and as such require us to act with compassion in both our direct and indirect interactions with them. Within AWE, critical thinking and participatory exercises challenge students’ individual and collective responsibility to other sentient beings and to wider society, and as an educational process the World Society for the Protection of Animals’ First Concepts in Animal Welfare (FCAW) programme uses such pedagogies to empower five to sixteen year olds in formal education to seek out animal welfare focused solutions across the globe. Within AWE’s ethical framework the concepts of justice and citizenship provide entry points for this exploration, and begin to frame the application of a self-developed responsibility towards those animals under our care and those that remain in the wild. AWE asks students to question the bargain we make with these animals and to begin to consider how we construct just and compassionate relationships, reverberating to those non-human animals that lie outside our immediate control as well as the humans in our social and familial circles. The FCAW programme applies this educational model via a robust and varied methodology, including pre and in-service training for teachers in the delivery of AWE, national curriculum development, and the tailoring of educational materials to integrate animal welfare language across disciplines.

In: Power, Justice and Citizenship: The Relationships of Power

conspecific density: a new mechanism arising from predation risk assessment. Oikos 100: 409-415. Peacor, S.D., Werner, E.E. 1997. Trait-mediated indirect interactions in a simple aquatic food web. Ecology 78: 1146-1156. Werner, E.E., Anholt, B.R. 1996. Predator-induced behavioral indirect effects

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

. Predator-induced behavioral indirect effects: consequences to competitive interactions in anuran larvae. Ecology 77: 157-169. Werner, E.E., Peacor, S.D. 2003. A review of trait-mediated indirect interactions in ecological communities. Ecology 84: 1083-1100.

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

web-building spiders: Hypochilus, Coras Achaearanea (Araneae: Hypochilidae, Amaurobiidae and Theridiidae) J. Arachnol 1996 24 101 110 Holt R.D. Spatial heterogeneity, indirect interactions and the coexistence of prey species Am. Nat 1984 124 377 406 Holt R.D. Polis G.A. A theoretical

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. J. Med. Entomol. 43: 221-224. Pace, M. L., Cole, J. J., Carpenter, S. R., Kitchell, J. F. 1999. Trophic cascades revealed in diverse ecosystems. Trend Ecol. Evol. 14: 483-488. Peacor, S. D., Werner, E. E. 1997. Trait-mediated indirect interactions in a simple

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution

. Gjata N , Scotti M , Jordán F . 2012 . The strength of simulated indirect interaction modules in a real food web . Ecol Complex . 11 : 160 – 164 . Hastings A , Powell T . 1991 . Chaos in a three species food chain . Ecology . 72 : 896 – 903 . Heckmann L , Drossel B

In: Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution