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Author: Kevin McCain

. First, he argues that only a version of the Explanationist Response that provides an a priori justification of inference to the best explanation ( ibe ) can hope to respond to two serious objections. 3 , 4 Second, he argues that providing such an a priori justification requires an

In: International Journal for the Study of Skepticism
Author: Ali Hasan

1 Introduction I defend external world realism. I assume that our experiences have accessible spatial content but leave more or less open the metaphysical nature of these experiences and contents. 1 I also assume that the principle of inference to the best explanation is justified

In: International Journal for the Study of Skepticism
Author: Mark Walker

abduction, or what we might think of as the ‘inference to the best explanation strategy’, for responding to skepticism. 3 The predominant version, going back at least to Locke, invokes Occam’s razor: the common sense view of the external world—the idea that our world comprises material objects which 4 —is

In: International Journal for the Study of Skepticism
In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy
Author: Frank Cabrera

Kevin McCain and Ted Poston (eds.), Best Explanations: New Essays on Inference to the Best Explanation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. 302. isbn : 978-0-19-874690-4. 1 Introduction This much-anticipated volume, edited by Kevin McCain and Ted Poston, comprises sixteen

In: International Journal for the Study of Skepticism

of inference to the best explanation. The paper is conceived as follows. In the first section, I argue that the postulation of primitive nonconceptual forms of self-consciousness lacks a clear motivation. I argue that we have better solutions to the old and new puzzles raised by the phenomenon of

In: Grazer Philosophische Studien

Opponents of inference to the best explanation often raise the objection that theories that give us the best explanation of some phenomena need not be the most probable ones. And they are certainly right. But what can we conclude from this insight? Should we ban abduction from theory choice and work instead, for example, with a Bayesian approach? This would be a mistake brought about by a certain misapprehension of the epistemological task. We have to think about the real aims of epistemology and scientific practice in order to see that we are not primarily interested in the most probable theories but in explanatory ones leading to a coherent model of our world.

In: Grazer Philosophische Studien

Abstract

It is claimed that Kuipers’ approach to explanation opens the possibility for a further refinement of his own refined HD method for the evaluation of theories. One severe problem for the HD method, refined or not, is theory-ladeness. Given that experimental results are theory-laden, the comparative evaluation of alternative hypotheses is always relative to background knowledge. This difficulty can be avoided by supplementing HD considerations with the principle of inference to the best explanation. The authors sketch a program for doing this. The general idea plays on some similarities between Kuipers’ account of explanation and Lipton’s. The former, however, is considered more flexible than the latter, which makes it even more attractive for the purpose under consideration.

In: Cognitive Structures in Scientific Inquiry

"something like an inference to the best explanation"; he says that it "is an elaboration of the 'principle of charity' Godlove mentions" (Proudfoot 1995: 283). Since I am all for charity, whether any large issues divide us here depends on how each of us envisions the details of the "elaboration". So, to lay

In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion

"something like an inference to the best explanation"; he says that it "is an elaboration of the 'principle of charity' Godlove mentions" (Proudfoot 1995: 283). Since I am all for charity, whether any large issues divide us here depends on how each of us envisions the details of the "elaboration". So, to lay

In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion