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Introduction Through the examples of the Nam Theun 2 ( nt 2) and Xayaburi hydroelectric power projects in Laos pdr , this monograph provides a subject overview of public-private partnerships ( ppp s) for infrastructure development on transboundary international waters and the applicable law of

In: Brill Research Perspectives in International Water Law

Introduction Through the examples of the Nam Theun 2 ( nt 2) and Xayaburi hydroelectric power projects in Laos pdr , this monograph provides a subject overview of public-private partnerships ( ppp s) for infrastructure development on transboundary international waters and the applicable law of

In: Transboundary Waters, Infrastructure Development and Public Private Partnership

occur. That is the problem investigated here. It turns out that the shift in tank weight can be understood if seen as related to the civilian infrastructure, with bridges as the critical component. As a starting-point let us look at what has been written about the early Swedish tank development. The

In: Vulcan

[German version] The modern term infrastructure refers to the structures and arrangements which create the material prerequisites for the social processes of production and exchange. This definition, under which for antiquity the systems of transport and communications infrastructure (roads

In: Brill's New Pauly Online

The term infrastructure is a modern coinage [7. 370]. Borrowed from military usage, in the 1960s it also became established in economic contexts; it denotes the necessary organizational foundation needed for a country’s economy. In today’s usage, infrastructure includes facilities for

2013. The revolution’s calls for “Bread, Freedom and Social Justice” have not materialized under the current regime of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. What has remained consistent, however, is the state’s reliance on infrastructural legibility, or reinforcing the produced nature of potable water, to

In: Middle East Law and Governance

this includes a territorial dimension ‘as it requires a technological infrastructure that operates from certain locations, and as it connects functions and people located in specific places’ ( Castells 2000 : 14). A number of aspects are important to consider here. First, media networks exist in

In: Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication

within the infrastructure and logistics of “containerization,” which David Harvey has called “one of the great innovations without which we would not have had globalization.” 1 While the metal box of “the standardized shipping container is a simple object,” according to Craig Martin, it

In: Journal of World Literature
Legal Theory, Codification, and Local Practice
Islamic foundations ( waqf, pl. awqāf) have been an integral part of Yemeni society both for managing private wealth and as a legal frame for charity and public infrastructure. This book focuses on four socially grounded fields of legal knowledge: fiqh, codification, individual waqf cases, and everyday waqf-related knowledge. It combines textual analysis with ethnography and seeks to understand how Islamic law is approached, used, produced, and validated in selected topics of waqf law where there are tensions between ideals and pragmatic rules. The study analyses central Zaydī fiqh works such as the Sharḥ al-azhār cluster, imamic decrees, fatwās, and waqf documents, mostly from Zaydī, northern Yemen.

The introduction of Western science in order to change physical and operational aspects of Shanghai’s Huangpu River had been debated by Qing and Western officials since almost the beginning of its history as a Treaty Port. At stake in those debates was the perception of the river’s proper use: as a natural barrier for military defense, or as a conduit for global trade. After the Western powers unified to militarily suppress the Boxer Uprising in 1900, they attained their long-awaited goal of the right to transform the river for global trade as part of Article 11 of the Boxer Protocol: the Junpuju (or Huangpu Conservancy Board) was created and authorized by the central government to make the Huangpu River navigable for shipping vessels. Although the Junpuju continued the ethos of earlier extra-bureaucratic organizations established during the Self-Strengthening Movement, after 1901 the organization bore the authority of the central government. During the era of the New Policies, Qing officials were intent on revising the original terms of river conservancy so that they would be more favorable to Chinese sovereignty. At the same time, imperialist rivalries among the Western powers ruptured the apparent unity of the earlier alliance during the suppression of the Boxer Uprising. Before long, Western corruption in the Huangpu River dredging was brought to the attention of Qing officials, who deftly used it to recover Qing control over certain parts of the body of the river.

In: Frontiers of History in China