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Providing both an international organizations and research bibliography, Volume 4 cites over 46,000 publications and information resources supplied by international organizations, and provides nearly 18,000 research citations under 40 subject headings. This volume also includes a research bibliography on international organizations and transnational associations.
Winner of the 2018 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award.

The Yearbook of International Organizations is a comprehensive resource of intergovernmental (IGOs) and international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) worldwide. The annual yearbook is published via the following six thematic volumes:

Vol 1A and 1B: Organization Descriptions and Cross-References
Vol 2: Geographical Index — A Country Directory of Secretariats and Memberships
Vol 3: Global Action Networks — A Subject Directory and Index
Vol 4: International Organization Bibliography and Resources
Vol 5: Statistics, Visualizations and Patterns
Vol 6: Who's Who in International Organizations

Starting in 2018, the 6th Volume of the Yearbook will be devoted to: Global Civil Society and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

The Yearbook is also available online.
This series aims to provide authoritative guidance on all aspects of the law of international organizations. This area of law has, over the years, developed into a separate field of study within the discipline of public international law. While it covers the law of individual organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the International Criminal Court, and the European Union, it also includes thematic institutional law topics such as membership, decision-making, legal personality, and responsibility of international organizations. In these and other areas, international organizations face similar questions and share a number of common characteristics. The series aims to include works written by practitioners as well as academics.

Immunity rules are part and parcel of the law of international organizations. It has long been accepted that international organizations and their staff need to enjoy immunity from the jurisdiction of national courts. However, it is the application of these rules in practice that increasingly causes controversy. Claims against international organizations are brought before national courts by those who allegedly suffer from their activities. These can be both natural and legal persons such as companies. National courts, in particular lower courts, have often been less willing to recognize the immunity of the organization concerned than the organization’s founding fathers. Likewise, public opinion and legal writings frequently criticize international organizations for invoking their immunity and for the lack of adequate means of redress for claimants.

It is against this background that an international conference was organized at Leiden University in June 2013. A number of highly qualified academics and practitioners gave presentations and prepared written contributions that are collected in this book. This book is published to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the International Organizations Law Review, in which these contributions have also been published (Vol. 10, issue 2, 2014).
This book deals with the question of national sovereignty and States' participation in International Organizations, whether traditional or supranational ones. Although there has been much discussion on the problems posed by the transference of sovereignty, this volume provides an original insight in that transfer of state sovereignty is approached as a dynamic process that can be divided into three different phases. Part one, called `the initial phase', focuses on the examination of the domestic legal basis for the transfer of state sovereignty. Part two, `the transfer phase', investigates how the process of transfer evolves within the core of two International Organizations: the United Nations and the European Communities. Part three, `the post-transfer phase', analyses the States' responses to the effects and consequences of the transfer of sovereignty.
The International Organizations Law Review is a peer-reviewed journal that only publishes articles that have passed through an anonymous review process.

After the Second World War, the law of international organizations developed as a separate, but not separable, discipline within the sphere of public international law. The International Organizations Law Review functions as a discussion forum for both academics and practitioners active in this discpline. The Review offers two foci: one based in the world of scholarship and the other in the world of practice. Academic scholarship offered in the Review will focus on general and theoretical developments in international institutional law, while practitioner views offer a forum to identify and discuss legal developments within existing international organizations.

Papers for consideration or proposals for special issues should be addressed to Professors Niels Blokker and Ramses Wessel at ( ).

Online submission: Articles for publication in the International Organizations Law Review can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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A Critical Analysis of the Interpretative Framework of the Constituent Instruments of International Organizations
This book analyzes the law-creating process relating to the interpretation of constituent instruments of international organizations. This topic is one of the key issues concerning the structures and activities of international organizations. It differs from other books in the field by suggesting that, under the influences of the inherent dynamism of international organizations, the interpretative framework of their constituent instruments is not the same as that of ordinary treaties. It also concludes that the interpretation of the constituent instruments of international organizations deviates from the interpretative framework regulated by the law of treaties as codified by the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. The book will be of prime interest to academics in the fields of international law and international organization and treaty law.

of the hundreds of intergovernmental organizations subject to public international law 2 (referred to here as ‘international organizations’ or ‘IOs’). The EU General Data Protection Regulation (‘ GDPR ’), 3 which became applicable on 25 May 2018, illustrates the tensions between EU law

In: Volume null: Issue null: International Organizations Law Review
Editors: Virzo and Ingravallo
Because of their increasing prevalence and diversity, International Organizations (IOs) are one of the most striking legal phenomena in contemporary international law. Evolutions in the Law of International Organizations, is a collection of essays discussing the ever-changing nature of IOs. It covers all the many considerable practical evolutions in the law of, offers a discussion of theoretical issues and proposes solutions to many crucial problems related to these institutional developments. The book explores controversial institutional issues arising from recent developments in the complex international practice of IOs and includes contributions about the definition of IOs, the role of "soft" IOs and regional IOs, the reformation of international financial institutions, and the liability of IOs for their actions, among others.
This work provides a comprehensive theory of the system of legal norms that are developed partly in the internal written (constitutional) law of intergovernmental organizations and partly through their consistent practice, and that are therefore common to intergovernmental organizations.
The legal construction presented in this volume consists of the following main elements:
As for all other self-governing communities all intergovernmental organizations possess their own internal law governing their relations with 1) the organs of the organization, 2) the officials and 3) the member states in their capacity as members of the organization. Some organizations exercise in addition extended (delegated) jurisdiction over states, other organizations and/or individuals.
Secondly, as for other self-governing communities all intergovernmental organizations are subjects of public international law in their relations with other self-governing communities (states and other intergovernmental organizations), and in the case of extended jurisdiction, also in relations with individuals and private entities.
Thirdly, as for all other self-governing communities possessing its own internal law (its distinct lex personalis), intergovernmental organizations enter into relations of a private law nature with both public and private entities. Governed by the rules on conflict of laws, these relations must be determined by assessing relevant 1) personal, 2) territorial and 3) organic connecting factors.
Thus Common Law of Intergovernmental Organizations brings together all those elements pertaining to the theory of objective legal personality that have been presented in a scattered fashion, in bits and pieces.
Common Law of Intergovernmental Organizations, starting out from the position of objective legal personality, is fully compatible with modern requirements of good governance and accountability of international organizations, and particularly adaptable to the ideal of “systemic integration” of legal regimes constituting internal law of the organization.