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Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent

Ohio Omiunu

studies – Canada and Belgium. 3 Sub-national Participation in International Trade Relations: A Deviation from the Norm In this section of the paper, the focus would be on the changing dynamics of sub-national participation in the international trade mechanisms of Belgium and Canada. The

Series:

Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent
Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of the African Yearbook of International Law.

Diplomacy and Advocacy


The case of the King of Denmark v. Dutch Skippers before the Danzig City Council (1564–1567)


Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz and Alain Wijffels

Against the background of the Northern Seven Years’ War, a Dutch fleet carrying salt from France to the Baltic was arrested in 1564 by the Danish authorities in the Sound, and only allowed to proceed after declaring under oath that they would not sell their cargo to Denmark’s enemy. Afterwards, having reached the Baltic, the fleet encountered a Swedish man-of-war which (according to the Dutchmen) forced them to sail to Stockholm, where the salt was sold at a fixed price. The fleet then sailed to Danzig, where the ships and goods were seized. The incident appears to have played a part in the closure of the Sound to Dutch trade by the Danish Crown, which tried to put pressure on the rulers of the Netherlands for their support in his war efforts. A practical solution to the diplomatic crisis was worked out in setting up a trial opposing the king of Denmark to the skippers of the seized ships before the municipal authorities of Danzig, a city under the overlordship of the King of Poland, who was allied to Denmark in the war against Sweden, while Danzig itself endeavoured to avoid any direct involvement in the warfare. The lawsuit followed the format of civil law procedure. The memorandum and rejoinders, together with a consilium to which a subscriptio by several law professors of Louvain was added, document how a political and diplomatic dispute could be defused and managed through quasi-judicial proceedings and legal arguments. An interim decree of the Danzig authorities discharged the Dutch skippers (1565) and that provisional outcome was eventually confirmed by the king of Poland’s final decision (1567).


Series:

Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only periodical devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to a better acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the application of international law, and its observance in intra-African relations, are viewed as being integral to Africa’s own economic and political development.
Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.
The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-African agencies.

Series:

Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to the acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the development of international law is viewed as being integral to Africa’s own development.
Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.
The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-African agencies.

Series:

Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to the acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the development of international law is viewed as being integral to Africa’s own development.
Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.
The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-african agencies.

Series:

Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to the acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the development of international law is viewed as being integral to Africa’s own development.
Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.
The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-african agencies.

Series:

Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only periodical devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to a better acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the application of international law, and its observance in intra-African relations, are viewed as being integral to Africa’s own economic and political development.
Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.
The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-African agencies.

Editor-in-Chief Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now also published online is published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law. It is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to the acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the development of international law is viewed as being integral to Africa’s own development.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.

The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-african agencies.

Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of the African Yearbook of International Law.