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The International Criminal Law Series contains books, monographs and collections of essays on current issues of international criminal law. Its aim is to advance scholarly and practitioner understanding of the discipline of ICL and its evolving interaction with other legal disciplines on a global basis.
A Collection of International and Regional Instruments. Fourth Revised Edition
International Criminal Law has become a mainstream subject. While it was hardly taught at law faculties at the time of the first edition of this book (1996), it is now highly featured in academic curricula. Practitioners, academics and political decision makers are increasingly confronted with this discipline.
Within the framework of the United Nations and the European Union, but also in other regional bodies, there has been a dramatic increase in the conventions on various aspects of international criminal law. In fact much of the day-to-day work of lawyers around the globe is about the subject. International criminal law is gradually supple-menting human rights as the standard to assess governments and individuals. In the process, it has become part of the vocabulary of the general public. Many recent crisis situations have contributed to this phenomenon, from 11/9 and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to the Arab spring and SC Resolution 1973 (2011) giving effect to R2P in Libya.
International criminal courts, which until some time ago, were still somewhat exotic, are now part of the mainstream international judicial establishment. The UN ad hoc tribunals together with the mixed tribunals and special courts have substantially con-tributed to the development of international criminal jurisprudence. Meanwhile the International Criminal Court is in full operation, delivering its first landmark decisions and dealing with an increasing number of situations and cases.
In the European Union, the Lisbon Treaty is representing an important step towards the growing integration in the field of criminal law and procedure. A comparable trend is incipient in many other regions and organisations.
This collection is meant to guide students and practitioners through the labyrinth of international criminal law instruments. It comprises international (universal) and Euro-pean conventions, while also including other regional instruments (AU/OAU, ASEAN, the Commonwealth, OAS and SAARC).


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2023 Impact Factor: 0,8
5 Year Impact Factor: 0,6

The practice at the different international criminal tribunals has shown that there is no real international criminal (customary) law, but only extrapolations from international public law, general principles of law and humanitarian law. The divide between the so-called common law and civil law systems and their differences in approach to solving legal problems make it necessary to establish an international forum for discussion and development of a common ground on which the work of the international courts can build. This is especially true with regard to the so-called “General Part” of the substantive criminal law, like forms of participation, actus reus and mens rea categories, defences and excuses, offence types, sentencing, enforcement etc. But also the procedural law still lacks sharp features in many aspects; the ICC’s Rules of Procedure and Evidence are still in need of interpretation. In addition, it will be helpful to the Courts to understand the societal background and effects of the law. Thus there is also a need for criminological, sociological and historical research on the issues of ICL.

The International Criminal Law Review publishes in-depth analytical research that deals with these issues. The analysis may cover:
• the substantive and procedural law on the international level;
• important cases from national jurisdictions which have a bearing on general issues;
• criminological and sociological; and,
• historical research.
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International Studies Association Annual Meeting (New Orleans, 2015). The genealogy of this project traces to a conference on the legacies of the ictr held at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa, in 2013. Domestic criminal law informs the register of international criminal law, whether formally

In: International Criminal Law Review

to justice have played a key role in fighting impunity in transitional societies and thus, contribute to international criminal law. Similarly, several initiatives undertaken at the au level, have contributed to the development of international criminal law, thereby evidencing a cross

In: International Criminal Law Review
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* SJD in Comparative Constitutional Law, Central European University (Budapest). This article is a result of a research fellowship at Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg, Germany. 1 Introduction Causal responsibility is one of the foundations of

In: International Criminal Law Review
Editor-in-Chief:
As a discipline, International Criminal Law seems to be fully emancipated from public international law, international humanitarian law and international human rights law. Yet it does not operate in a vacuum. At the international level, the practice at the different international criminal tribunals and courts constitutes clear evidence of the synergies between these legal spheres. At the national level, International Criminal Law is increasingly becoming an integral part of the legal culture, thus interacting with substantive and procedural domestic norms. In addition, whether at the international or the national level, the practice also highlights the societal import and impact of international criminal law and justice. Anthropological, criminological, sociological, ethical and historical research on international criminal law and justice is thus key to fully grasp the discipline, in both its theoretical and practical dimensions. These blurred frontiers make it necessary to provide for a cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary academic forum to enable discussions on the interactions between international criminal law and justice and distinct legal domains, other disciplines, transitional justice mechanisms, and domestic systems. Studies in International Criminal Law follows the path drawn by the International Criminal Law Review and aims at publishing in-depth analytical research that deals with these issues in a format that will allow for both single-authored monographs and edited volumes.
Written by one of the world's pioneers and leading authorities on international criminal law, this text book covers the history, nature, and sources of international criminal law; the ratione personae; ratione materiae--sources of substantive international criminal law; the indirect enforcement system; the direct enforcement system; the function of the international criminal court; rules of procedure and evidence applicable to international criminal proceedings; and the future of international criminal law.

The first textbook to address this important topic, it is comprehensive, easy to read, and ideally suited for classroom use.

Published under the Transnational Publishers imprint.