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Author: Michael Talbot

fixing of borders in 1699 and 1718 meant that maritime territoriality was a definable and implementable concept, particularly given that treaties like Passarowitz made explicit mention of the sea as a legal space. In the fifteenth article of the Venetian text of that treaty, it specifically set forth

In: Journal of Early Modern History
In: Well-Connected Domains
Well-Connected Domains offers a fresh perspective on the history of the Ottoman Empire as deeply connected to the world beyond its borders by way of trade, warfare and diplomacy, as much as intellectual exchanges, migration, and personal relations.
While for decades the Ottoman Empire has been portrayed as largely aloof and distant from - as well as disinterested in - developments abroad, this collection of essays edited by Pascal W. Firges, Tobias P. Graf, Christian Roth, and Gülay Tulasoğlu highlights the deep entanglement between the Ottoman realm and its European neighbors. Taking their starting points from individual case studies, the contributions offer novel interpretations of a variety of aspects of Ottoman history as well as new impulses for future research.

Contributors are: Sotirios Dimitriadis, Suraiya N. Faroqhi, Maximilian Hartmuth, Gábor Kármán, Aylin Koçunyan, Viorel Panaite, Nur Sobers-Khan, Michael Talbot, and Joshua M. White
Chinese Foreign Policy Elites Discuss Emerging Trends in International Politics
Editor: SHAO Binhong
Where do we see China’s changes? What are the guiding principles behind these changes? Are China’s diplomatic policies and international strategies more reflective of its own national conditions or international trends? How will China balance its ideology with national interests? How does China see the current international order and its new position within the existing order? Besides answering these basic questions, this volume considers two other important issues: First, the future of China after its era of continuous high-speed growth; and second, (the all-important question in China’s foreign affairs) the future of Sino-US relations?

2013 was China’s first year under new leadership, and there is a consensus amongst researchers of China’s international affairs that the diplomatic practices China undertook to a great extent demonstrated new characteristics, perspectives, and requirements of the new leadership.

, Norway claims three uninhabited areas in Antarctica: Bouvet Island, Queen Maud Land and Peter I Island.For additional reading see:      --  Jon D. Carlson et al., “Scramble for the Arctic: Layered Sovereignty, UNCLOS, and Competing Maritime Territorial Claims,” SAIS Review of International Affairs 33, 2

In: Foreign Law Guide
Author: Pascal Firges

Ottoman shipping” (174). This happened whenever Britain went to war with France and sent privateers into the eastern Mediterranean, to which the Ottomans reacted with new regulations on maritime territoriality (182-195). The early nineteenth century witnessed the emergence of a more aggressive British

In: Journal of Early Modern History
Author: Xiaobing Li

) and the PRC, and identifies some patterns “marked by notable consistencies” (18). Cole looks into China’s maritime territorial interests and its disputes with six neighboring countries over more than two dozen maritime territories. Cole points out that “Beijing’s inflexibilities” over its territorial

In: Journal of Chinese Military History
Author: Hongsheng Wu

rule facilitated or contained the Zheng organization’s development. Consequently, one may suspect the dual identification of Fujianese maritime power: both China-based and maritime-oriented. The issue inspires readers to consider maritime Chinese (Fujianese) identity, the uncertainty of maritime

In: Asian Review of World Histories
Author: Pascal Firges

Ottoman shipping” (174). This happened whenever Britain went to war with France and sent privateers into the eastern Mediterranean, to which the Ottomans reacted with new regulations on maritime territoriality (182-195). The early nineteenth century witnessed the emergence of a more aggressive British

In: Journal of Early Modern History