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Educating Media Literacy

The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education

Series:

Allison T. Butler

Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.

The Critical Media Literacy Guide

Engaging Media and Transforming Education

Series:

Douglas Kellner and Jeff Share

Over half the world’s population is now online, interconnected through a globally-networked media and consumer society. The convergence of information, media, and technology has created the predominant ecosystem of our time. Yet, most educational institutions are still teaching what and how they have for centuries, and are thus increasingly out-of-date and out-of-touch with our current needs. The Critical Media Literacy Guide: Engaging Media and Transforming Education provides a theoretical framework and practical applications for educators and teacher education programs to transform education by putting critical media literacy into action in classrooms with students from kindergarten to university. Douglas Kellner and Jeff Share lay out the evolution of thinking and development of media and cultural studies, from the Frankfurt School to current intersectional theories about information and power that highlight the importance of race, gender, class, and sexuality. They provide insightful and accessible entry into theorizing education and information communication technologies through linking the politics of representation with critical pedagogy.

The increase in fake news, alternative facts, bots, and trolls, challenge our abilities to judge credibility and recognize bias. Kellner and Share present a critical lens and strategies to contextualize and analyze the dominant ideologies going viral across social media platforms and disseminated globally from enormous transnational corporations. The Critical Media Literacy Guide is a powerful resource to analyze and challenge representations and narratives of multiple forms of identity, privilege, and oppression. Since the struggle for social justice and democracy require new theories and pedagogies to maneuverer the constantly changing terrain, this book is essential for all educators.

This is a multidisciplinary journal dedicated to conceptualizations of criticality in media literacy. The focus is on articles that engage with media in ways that disrupt the normative discourses perpetuated through market logics and dominate institutions, promote ways of thinking critically about and with digital media culture, and present opportunities for analyzing and interpreting the codes, conventions, and ideologies implicit in our media saturated lives. It also centers on the ways in which critical media literacy is absent in today’s standardized educational curriculum. JCML has two issues per volume. It is a peer refereed journal and is available as hard copy and online. The hard copy issues can include artwork, and photographs. The on-line version can include artwork, photographs, audio and videos. Manuscripts can cover but are not limited to such topics as: the history of the field of critical media literacy, the state of critical media literacy studies and the urgency of critical media literacy knowledge at the present historical moment, critical media literacy in classrooms, etc.

For questions and/or submissions please contact the Editors, Bill Reynolds and/or Brad Porfilio.

Petar Jandrić

, everyone watches the same advertisements. Streaming services such as YouTube use recommendation systems to direct us towards watching certain content and offer personalized advertisements, yet we can always choose to watch something else. Critical media literacy is important, because it helps us navigate

Derek R. Ford

Critical media literacy is about how to read the media critically. It calls for teachers and students to deconstruct, demystify, and decode linguistic and visual media representations. Along the way, educational subjects examine the historical, political, economic, and social relations behind the

Series:

Edited by Christian Z. Goering and Paul L. Thomas

This edited collection is not a response to the 2016 United States Presidential Election so much as it is a response to the issues highlighted through that single event and since when incredibly smart, sophisticated, and intelligent members of our society were confused by misinformation campaigns. While media literacy and critical media literacy are ideas with long histories in formal education, including K-12 students and higher education, the need for increased attention to these issues has never reached a flash point like the present. The essays collected here are confrontations of post-truth, fake news, mainstream media, and traditional approaches to formal schooling. But there are no simple answers or quick fixes. Critical media literacy, we argue here, may well be the only thing between a free people and their freedom.

Brian Lozenski and Guy Chinang

which we are force-fed dehumanizing propaganda about the worlds we inhabit and the people with which we share them. If we are to envision critical media literacy as having any liberatory potential, it must impact the material realities of people who have been dispossessed of land, labor, and capacities

Lori Bindig Yousman

smart phones and Snapchat, educators have been engaging in media literacy initiatives around the world ( Considine, 2002 ; Masterman, 2001 ). Conceived as an extension of traditional literacy, media literacy is “the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and create media in a variety of forms” ( Hobbs

Bill Yousman

, literally changed my life. Since then, Hall’s writings and lectures on media, culture, race, class, power, and ideology have been a major influence on my own approach to pedagogy and media studies and they are foundational to my belief in a form of critical media literacy that goes beyond the mere analysis

Joseph Savirimuthu

International Journal of Children’s Rights 19 (2011) 547–569 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI 10.1163/157181811X587340 brill.nl/chil T HE I NTERNATIONAL J OURNAL OF C HILDREN ’ S R IGHTS Th e EU, Online Child Safety and Media Literacy Joseph Savirimuthu School of Law and Social Justice