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mediation engagement in a number of international conflicts, in particular, in its Eastern neighborhood (Bergmann & Niemann 2015: 971–72). In addition to its involvement as a direct lead or co-mediator in peace negotiations, the EU has also supported peace processes by providing information and

In: International Negotiation

Mediation by individuals, countries or intergovernmental organizations ( igo s) in interstate conflicts and civil wars occurs frequently, yet we still have much to learn about the factors that promote the onset and success of such mediation efforts. The articles in this special issue of

In: International Negotiation
Author: Mona Fixdal

The articles in this thematic issue of International Negotiation identify some of the most challenging aspects of mediation. 1 In this short introduction, I analyze these challenges as they appear in three areas: the who , the when and the what of mediation. A common thread throughout the

In: International Negotiation

Powerful state actors are the most common mediators of international conflict. They are also thought to possess unique and desirable capabilities as conflict managers as a result of their power and sovereignty: the ability to manipulate conflicting parties with credible commitments to provide

In: International Negotiation
Author: Eric Keels

step, though, to having disputants take ownership of the peace process is that they must first negotiate in earnest. While mediators acting on behalf of the African Union sought to employ a facilitative approach to mediation, diplomats from the United States imposed both positive and negative

In: International Negotiation
Author: Denise Garcia

In 2014, a seminar hosted by Professor Monica Herz and colleagues launched the “Global South Unit for Mediation” ( gsum ), an initiative of the Institute of International Relations of the Pontifical Catholic University, Rio de Janeiro ( iri / puc -Rio), with support from the government of Norway

In: International Negotiation
Author: Peter Jones

Canadians have traditionally thought of themselves as “helpful fixers” internationally. An area where many Canadians would assume their country to be active is conflict mediation. How true is this? Over the summer of 2010, I was asked by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) at

In: International Negotiation