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Announcing the winner of the Leslie Page Moch Award 2020.

Migration is an important topic of academic, public and political debate. Migration research generates a wealth of articles. The Journal of Migration History (JMH) is the first to specialize in the field. Articles on migration history either appear in journals that specialize on current issues, or in more general historical journals. In both cases the articles are somewhat lost. They also appear in journals that focus on areas (i.e., Asia, Europe, Africa) or in journals that focus on a particular time period (ancient history, medieval history). There is great need for a journal that covers a large period (antiquity until now) and all parts of the world, enabling to strengthen comparisons over time and space. This is a key aspect of migration research.

The peer-reviewed Journal of Migration History is interdisciplinary. It publishes articles that combine methods, theories and insights from the social sciences, archaeology, anthropology, genetics, linguistics, and economics. It publishes studies that emphasize connectivity, tying in with the vibrant field of global history. The journal will not only publish on how people move, but also on how goods, and ideas move. JMH will not only look at movement (in the widest sense of the word), but also at migration policies (and how and why they changed over time), at the consequences of migration (for migrants and for those who were left behind, and for the societies they left or where they settled). It will publish on how geographical mobility is related to other forms of mobility (social mobility), and on how ethnicity relates to gender, religion and class.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

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Historiography has long considered states and other organizations central actors in the making of history. Migrants, men and women and sometimes children, cross state borders in pursuit of life-projects or, at the minimum, to secure incomes. Involuntary migrants, refugees, exiles, those escaping natural disasters also cross borders. So do forced migrants from slaves and indentured servants in the past, to trafficked human beings in the present. All use their agency to re-establish life-courses, re-unite with family, re-construct social networks or innovatively create new ones.

Global migration history is political history; imperial formations from antiquity up to the modern period depended on the (voluntary and involuntary) circulation of people ranging from administrative and military elites to deportees and slaves. Migrants change statewide history by withdrawing their capabilities from one unsatisfactory polity and adding it to another. They seek options to invest their human capital. Global migration history is also economic history – the mercantile entanglements across ancient and medieval Afro-Eurasia, the 17th- and 18th-century world system, the plantation belt and extractive industries in particular, and 20th and 21st century global capitalism would not have existed without forced migration of slaves and the voluntary migrations of merchants, laborers, and the owners of capital. States militarily sustained this order. In the present, whole states are dependent on migrants’ remittances, other societies on the caregiving labor of migrants. Furthermore, economic and political regimes shape and are shaped by gendered conceptions of mobile people in ways that have produced different experiences for women and men. Migration is and has been global, macro-regional, and micro-regional – the levels interact across continents. Migrants’ lives and the societies they change or, even, create, are transcultural.

The peer-reviewed book series Studies in Global Migration History emphasizes research that addresses migrants’ agency that neither begins nor ends in only one location. It intends to replace traditional centeredness on Europe by perspectives including all macro-regions of the world and movements between them. It also aims to expand the common focus of migration history beyond the modern period with studies targeting earlier centuries and millennia across the globe. The series privileges interdisciplinary approaches and studies of uneven developments of societies and regions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either one of the series editors Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Roland Wenzlhuemer or Elizabeth A. Zanoni, or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

This is a subseries of Studies in Global Social History.
A Global Perspective on Continuities and Discontinuities from the 19th to the 21st Centuries
Editors: Dirk Hoerder and Amarjit Kaur
Proletarian and Gendered Mass Migrations connects the 19th- and 20th-century labor migrations and migration systems in global transcultural perspective. It emphasizes macro-regional internal continuities or discontinuities and interactions between and within macro-regions. The essays look at migrant workers experiences in constraining frames and the options they seize or constraints they circumvent. It traces the development from 19th-century proletarian migrations to industries and plantations across the globe to 20th- and 21st-century domestics and caregiver migrations. It integrates male and female migration and shows how women have always been present in mass migrations. Studies on historical development over time are supplemented by case studies on present migrations in Asia and from Asia. A systems approach is combined with human agency perspectives.

Contributors include Rochelle Ball, Shelly Chan, Dennis D. Cordell, Michael Douglass, Christiane Harzig, Dirk Hoerder, Muhamad Nadratuzzaman Hosen, Hassène Kassar, Kamel Kateb, Amarjit Kaur, Kiranjit Kaur, Gijs Kessler, Akram Khater, Elizabeth A. Kuznesof, Vera Mackie, Adam McKeown, Tomoko Nakamatsu, Ooi Keat Gin, Aswatini Raharto, Marlou Schrover, and Patcharawalai Wongboonsin.