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Author: Stephen Gersh
This volume deals with the relation between Jacques Derrida’s writing and Neoplatonism (ancient, patristic, medieval). Starting from the undeniable fact of Derrida’s continuous engagement with this tradition, the present study deals not only with the actual reading of the Neoplatonists by Derrida (“Derrida after Neoplatonism”) but also with a hypothetical reading of Derrida by Neoplatonism (“Neoplatonism after Derrida”). Thus, the intended audience is both philologists and philosophers interested in the encounter of ancient and contemporary thought. Separate chapters are devoted to a general study of Neoplatonism and Deconstruction, commentaries on three Derridean texts in which their 'Neoplatonic' implications are developed, and a treatment of the problem of non-discursive thought in which all Neoplatonic and Derridean perspectives are transcended.

[German Version] Neoplatonism takes the system constructed by Plotinus as its starting point. Important representatives are Amelios, Porphyry, Iamblichus, Theodore of Asine, Emperor Julian the Apostate, Plutarch of Athens, Syrian, Proclus, Damascius, and Simplicius. Pagan Neoplatonism ends

In: Religion Past and Present Online
Author: Adamson, Peter

Neoplatonism was a philosophical tradition of late antiquity that had a powerful influence in the Islamic world, through Arabic translations of Neoplatonic texts in Greek. Ideas deriving from Neoplatonic philosophy are to be found in the work of many of the pre-eminent thinkers of the Islamic world

In: Encyclopaedia of Islam Three Online

Neoplatonism was a philosophical school based on Platonic doctrines whose founder, Plotinus (205-270 C.E.), claimed only to be an exegete of the teachings of Plato (Enn. V.1.8.10-14) and, before him, of the “ancients”, including the Pythagoreans. In the more than seven centuries after Plato

[German version] The term ‘Neoplatonism’ was coined in the 19th cent. and originally referred to a specific form of Platonism (Plato) in the 3rd to 5th cents. AD; in a wider sense, the term refers to the intellectual trends of the same period or later that share some of Platonism's characteristics

In: Brill's New Pauly Online
Author: Anne Sheppard

Neoplatonism ANNE SHEPPARD I begin this time with two important editions, one of ProclusÕ Hymns by R.M. van den Berg 1 and one of the fragments of IamblichusÕ De anima by John Finamore and John Dillon. 2 In the case of van den BergÕs edition of ProclusÕ Hymns , I have to declare an interest, as

In: Phronesis
Author: Anne Sheppard

Book Notes Neoplatonism ANNE SHEPPARD John GregoryÕs The Neoplatonists: A Reader 1 is the second edition of a book Ž rst published by Kyle Cathie in 1991. It contains translated selections, mostly from Plotinus but also from Porphyry, Iamblichus and Proclus, together with some brief but helpful

In: Phronesis
Author: Anne Sheppard

Neoplatonism ANNE SHEPPARD Joachim LacrosseÕs LÕamour chez Plotin 1 covers a good deal of familiar Plotinian material from a relatively novel point of view, combining discussion of PlotinusÕ concept of er™s with study of the role of er™s in PlotinusÕ metaphysics. He thus includes both a

In: Phronesis
Author: Anne Sheppard

Neoplatonism ANNE SHEPPARD The later Neoplatonists are attracting increasing amounts of scholarly attention. An invaluable guide to later Neoplatonic psychology is provided by the late Henry BlumenthalÕs Aristotle and Neoplatonism in Late Antiquity . 1 B. had been working on this book for many

In: Phronesis
Author: Anne Sheppard

Book Notes Neoplatonism ANNE SHEPPARD Books on Neoplatonism come in a variety of shapes and sizes: monographs, collections of papers, editions and translations. My current bunch includes one monograph and a number of items in each of the other categories. I begin with the monograph. Sara

In: Phronesis