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Authors: Narsi Patel and Jiri Kolaja

Personal-Impersonal Dimension in Organizational Behavior: A Variation of the Weberian Model NARSI PATEL AND JIRI KOLAJA University of Kentucky, U.S.A. IN this paper one aspect of Weber's theory of bureaucracy will be criti- cized and further developed. We propose that not only Weber but also

In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology
Author: Frania Hall

This paper is based on primary research conducted with 22 senior publishing industry managers in the UK as a preliminary survey for a PhD. It seeks to establish a base on which to develop further research around the changes taking place in the organizational and collaborative behaviour of an industry facing digital challenges. The survey asked the 22 managing directors and operations and digital directors how they view current conditions in the industry in light of digital change. It allows subjects to speak for themselves in order to learn (a) how far-reaching they feel change is, (b) where that change is having most effect in their day-to-day business, (c) whether they themselves are making organizational changes, and (d) how far collaboration forms part of this change. The collaboration aspect of the survey unpicks in more detail how far collaborations are (a) increasing in frequency, (b) are changing in vision (i.e. more exploratory or not), and (c) involve different organizational behaviour. The research reveals many areas of clear consensus around key issues of technical competence, new patterns in consumption, entrepreneurship, and silo structures. There is an understanding that the ability to respond quickly and to innovate continuously is essential. On collaborations, most people concurred that they were entering more partnerships than in the past and that these were often more experimental in approach and involved sharing risk; ultimately, this points to a clearer strategy emerging in companies to develop structures, skills, and techniques to facilitate new styles of collaboration, which in turn may lead to new ways of innovating in a flexible, failure-tolerant way.

In: Logos

in psychology, organizational behavior, and commu- nication sciences. Mathematical modeling, the use of experimental games, and the use of archival data are especially popular in economics and political science. Diverse methods can provide convergent insights, and this is observed clearly in work on

In: International Negotiation
Information and communication technologies (ICT) are major forces shaping our current age. ICT affects many areas of human existence and influences the both human wellbeing and human evil. The nonprofit sector is already heavily involved in technology both as a way to pursue its mission and as an influential factor in the evolution of the sector. This article examines how technology affects the sector and how the sector uses technology in its work.
The article begins with a discussion of how the emerging information society will change the nonprofit sector. The sector that we know is grounded on our experience in the agrarian and industrial periods in the United States and Europe. We then explore how technology evolved in the sector. This is followed by an examination of technology and nonprofit organizational behavior. Technology changes the organizations that make use of its capacities. Next is a discussion of the types of technology that nonprofit organizations use. The final three sections deal with technology and social change, technology in nonprofit settings, and issues and trends. This article provides the reader with a current appreciation of the scholarly and professional literature on ICT in the nonprofit sector.
Editor: Audrey Collin
It has long been lamented that, although several disciplines contribute to career scholarship, they work in isolation from one another, thus denying career theory, research, and practice the benefits that multidisciplinary collaboration would bring. This constitutes a lost opportunity at a time when new understandings and approaches are needed in order to respond effectively to global changes in society and work. This book takes a major step towards remedying this situation by bringing together two key perspectives on career, the vocational psychological and the organisational (interpreted broadly to include organisation behaviour and human resource management).
Written by international experts, the book opens by identifying some of the “tributaries” that flow into the “great delta of careers scholarship”, and noting the need to link what are at present separate “islands” of scholarship. It is structured to allow comparison between the ways in which the two perspectives address career development and career management theory, research and interventions. It concludes by pointing to the possibilities for dialogue, and even collaboration, between these perspectives, and suggesting ways in which these could be brought about.
The book will be essential reading for career scholars because, with its potential to stimulate new thinking and developments in theory and research and also, importantly, in practice (with beneficial spin-offs for policy-makers), this dialogue could open a new phase in career scholarship.
With its overviews of the history, theory, research and practice of both perspectives, the book will also be a valuable resource for students of both perspectives.

the agrarian and industrial periods in the United States and Europe. Next, we explore how technology evolved in the sector. This is followed by an examination of technology and nonprofit organizational behavior. Technology changes the organizations that make use of its capacities. Next is a discussion

In: Voluntaristics Review

the agrarian and industrial periods in the United States and Europe. Next, we explore how technology evolved in the sector. This is followed by an examination of technology and nonprofit organizational behavior. Technology changes the organizations that make use of its capacities. Next is a discussion

In: Technology in Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action

In this paper, we argue that national culture is important in interpreting the differences of entrepreneurial activities between countries. Furthermore, national wealth plays a moderating role between national culture and entrepreneurial activities. Datasets from the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) project and Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) study were analyzed. We find that there are interaction effects between GDP, a proxy for national wealth, and several cultural dimensions on entrepreneurial activities. More traditional cultural variables (in-group collectivism, humane orientation, and power distance) enhance early-stage and established entrepreneurship in low- and medium-GDP countries, but hinder early-stage and established entrepreneurship in high-GDP countries. More modernistic cultural variables (performance orientation, future orientation, and uncertainty avoidance) promote high-growth and high-innovation entrepreneurship in some situations, especially in high-GDP countries. Implications and limitations are discussed.

In: Frontiers of Business Research in China

The Triple Helix of university-industry-government interactions, highlighting the enhanced role of the university in the transition from industrial to knowledge-based society, has become widespread in innovation and entrepreneurship studies. We analyze classic literature and recent research, shedding light on the theoretical development of a model that has engendered controversy for being simultaneously analytical and normative, theoretical, practical and policy-relevant. We identify lacunae and suggest future analytical trajectories for theoretical development of the Triple Helix model. The explanatory power of Triple Helix has been strengthened by integrating various social science concepts, e.g. Simmel’s triad, Schumpeter’s organizational entrepreneur, institutional logics and social networks, into its framework. As scholars and practitioners from various disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research fields, e.g. artificial intelligence, political theory, sociology, professional ethics, higher education, regional geography and organizational behavior join Triple Helix studies or find their perspectives integrated, new directions appear for Triple Helix research.

In: Triple Helix