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(iconography, organology, archaeology, epigraphy, etc.), and the problems that this presents. Due to way that because material culture reflects the wider culture of the society which created it, most of the papers fell into three panels, organised by region. There were also two panels which focused on material

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies
Roots and Routes
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The shakuhachi is a traditional Japanese end-blown bamboo flute with a long history in a wide array of social, cultural, and geographic spheres. This book unravels some of the roots and routes connected with the shakuhachi, and discusses instrument types, construction process, social transmission, and performance practice. From the use of the instrument in court music from at least the eighth century, to the modern era that sees international shakuhachi festivals and workshops the world over, the instrument has been recontextualized in various social and cultural spheres. This book depicts and explains some of these contexts and transformations, and documents some of the many ways the shakuhachi has traveled to, within, and beyond its traditional cultural home.
The manuscript from the thirteenth century deals with musicians’ behaviour at the court; singers'qualities; the eminence of music and its effect on people and animals; the importance of drinking when listening to music; the process of composition; rhythmic and melodic modes, and repertoire in Andalusia, the Maghreb, Persia and the Middle East; Andalusian song lyrics and the appearance of new poetic forms such as the zajal and the muwashshaḥ; Andalusian musical instruments; dances of Egypt, Iraq, Syria, India and China; Andalusian dances and shadow plays and shadow dancers; aesthetics of dance; poems describing the dances.
Ḥāwī l-Funūn (Encompasser of the Arts) of Ibn al-Ṭaḥḥān (d. ca. 1057) is a medieval Arabic music dictionary that complements other sources because of the practical knowledge of the author who was an accomplished singer, lutenist and composer.

The first part in 80 chapters deals with compositions; voice production and characteristics, unison and duet singing, taking care of the voice; preludes, ornaments, ṭarab; the importance of tonality; approaches to teaching; musical and extra-musical behavior at the court; names of Syrian Fatimid and Ishshīdid singers.

The second part in 22 chapters includes lute manufacturing, frets placement, stringing and tuning; 47 rhythmic ornaments, names and definitions of rhythmic and melodic modes; types of dances; descriptions of 12 instruments.

Abstract

The present paper concentrates on one of the musical instruments retrieved from Grave II at Daphnē, the wooden aulos. Only one pipe of the instrument, together with its bulbous mouthpiece, was found. In the organological account which follows, the pipe is described and assessed, and an attempt is made to reconstruct it and discover its scale.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

Abstract

The present paper focuses on the trigōnon retrieved from Grave II. Only the sound box and one arm (the pillar) of the instrument have survived. In the organological study which follows, the find is evaluated in the light of the available iconography and literature, and of ancient and modern ethnological parallels. A replica was constructed in order to test the results of the analysis.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

Abstract

Some representative issues were revealed in a few emblematic case studies regarding musical data in Latin epigraphy. Some such issues are a complex relationship between texts and images, and the symbolic meaning of some specific musical depictions. Therefore, in order to add new information to what we know about the ancient Roman soundscape, it is necessary to tackle this question by taking an intercultural approach.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

are then compared with the model that, at the beginning of the century, contained their first theoretical seed: the Organology of Franz Joseph Gall. 1872 Historical Notes on Poisoning. Introductory Lecture at King's College, London, T. Richards. 1873 Experimental Researches in Cerebral Physiology

In: Nuncius

After the celebrations for the tenth anniversary of the journal, I am happy to present the first issue of volume 11. The topics addressed by the contributions in this issue include musical notation (Ronald Blankenborg), musical parody in ancient comedy (Amy Susanna Lewis), organology (Stefan

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In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

In this second issue of volume 11, musical themes are the focus of investigation from various disciplines, such as linguistics (Dieter Gunkel), new materialism and posthumanism (Deborah Steiner), papyrology (Laurent Capron), organology (Kamila Wysłucha and Stefan Hagel), rhetorics (Gianluigi

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In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies