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Author: James Lloyd

(iconography, organology, archaeology, epigraphy, etc.), and the problems that this presents. Due to way that because material culture reflects the wider culture of the society which created it, most of the papers fell into three panels, organised by region. There were also two panels which focused on material

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies
Roots and Routes
Author: Henry Johnson
The shakuhachi is a traditional Japanese end-blown bamboo flute with a long history in a wide array of social, cultural, and geographic spheres. This book unravels some of the roots and routes connected with the shakuhachi, and discusses instrument types, construction process, social transmission, and performance practice. From the use of the instrument in court music from at least the eighth century, to the modern era that sees international shakuhachi festivals and workshops the world over, the instrument has been recontextualized in various social and cultural spheres. This book depicts and explains some of these contexts and transformations, and documents some of the many ways the shakuhachi has traveled to, within, and beyond its traditional cultural home.
Ḥāwī l-Funūn (Encompasser of the Arts) of Ibn al-Ṭaḥḥān (d. ca. 1057) is a medieval Arabic music dictionary that complements other sources because of the practical knowledge of the author who was an accomplished singer, lutenist and composer.

The first part in 80 chapters deals with compositions; voice production and characteristics, unison and duet singing, taking care of the voice; preludes, ornaments, ṭarab; the importance of tonality; approaches to teaching; musical and extra-musical behavior at the court; names of Syrian Fatimid and Ishshīdid singers.

The second part in 22 chapters includes lute manufacturing, frets placement, stringing and tuning; 47 rhythmic ornaments, names and definitions of rhythmic and melodic modes; types of dances; descriptions of 12 instruments.

Abstract

The present paper concentrates on one of the musical instruments retrieved from Grave II at Daphnē, the wooden aulos. Only one pipe of the instrument, together with its bulbous mouthpiece, was found. In the organological account which follows, the pipe is described and assessed, and an attempt is made to reconstruct it and discover its scale.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

Abstract

The present paper focuses on the trigōnon retrieved from Grave II. Only the sound box and one arm (the pillar) of the instrument have survived. In the organological study which follows, the find is evaluated in the light of the available iconography and literature, and of ancient and modern ethnological parallels. A replica was constructed in order to test the results of the analysis.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

Abstract

Some representative issues were revealed in a few emblematic case studies regarding musical data in Latin epigraphy. Some such issues are a complex relationship between texts and images, and the symbolic meaning of some specific musical depictions. Therefore, in order to add new information to what we know about the ancient Roman soundscape, it is necessary to tackle this question by taking an intercultural approach.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

are then compared with the model that, at the beginning of the century, contained their first theoretical seed: the Organology of Franz Joseph Gall. 1872 Historical Notes on Poisoning. Introductory Lecture at King's College, London, T. Richards. 1873 Experimental Researches in Cerebral Physiology

In: Nuncius

extremely interesting topic encompassing musical psychology, organology, and cultural semantics. The issue continues with a series of papers dedicated to different subjects, which once again demonstrate the variety of interests and approaches of scholarly research on ancient music: through the analyses of

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In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies
Authors: Sean Gurd and John Franklin

These papers began life at the snowy Boston meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in January, 2018. They variously analyze the ancient battlefield through musical psychology, soundscapes, organology, and cultural semantics. There unfolds an examination of how battle scenes operated as

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies
Author: Henry Johnson
The shamisen is a traditional Japanese musical instrument. It was introduced to Japan in the mid-sixteenth century via China and the Ryûkyû Islands, and was quickly established as a culturally significant musical instrument in its new context. The instrument – a three-string lute – developed numerous styles of performance and is found as a solo and ensemble instrument in diverse social and cultural contexts. The shamisen is known as an instrument of geisha in the entertainment districts; it is used in kabuki and bunraku theatre; and also has an established place within a wide-range of performance traditions, many of which are depicted in woodblock prints and other art depicting everyday life of the Edo period.
This book, which is based on the author’s field research in Japan, is a history of the shamisen. It locates the instrument within its various social and cultural contexts, and includes accompanying illustrations (e.g., woodblock prints, photographs and illustrations) to help show visually the place of the instrument in traditional and modern Japan.