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Author: Ian Bride

31 Herpetofauna Pet-Keeping by Secondary School Students: Causes for Concern Ian Bride1 DURRELL INSTITUTE OF CONSERVATION AND ECOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF KENT AT CANTERBURY, UNITED KINGDOM This study of the patterns of the keeping of herpetofauna animals and associated animal welfare issues among

In: Society & Animals
Author: Susan Nance

plethora of other wild-animal wranglers from Steve Irwin and Jack Hanna to Siegfried & Roy, creating an explosion in the keeping of wild/exotic animal over the last 20 years. Exploring the extreme pet-keeping trend, The Elephant in the Living Room tells the surreal and melancholy stories of two men and

In: Society & Animals
Foucault and Animals is the first collection of its kind to explore the relevance of Michel Foucault’s thought for the question of the animal. Chrulew and Wadiwel bring together essays from emerging and established scholars that illuminate the place of animals and animality within Foucault’s texts, and open up his highly influential range of concepts and methods to different domains of human-animal relations including experimentation, training, zoological gardens, pet-keeping, agriculture, and consumption. Touching on themes such as madness and discourse, power and biopolitics, government and ethics, and sexuality and friendship, the volume takes the fields of Foucault studies and human-animal studies into promising new directions.

authorities viewed pet-keeping as a symbol of civility and development, and urged families to adopt animals. Pet animals were held up as examples for modern child-rearing practices, and also as a model for the Turkish national reform agenda (Sulos, 2017, p. 55). In 1912, the aforementioned animal

In: Society & Animals
Author: James Serpell

, anthro- pomorphism and its corollary, pet keeping, have obvious biolog- ical Žtness implications. On the animal side, anthropomorphism constitutes a unique evolutionar y selection pressure, analogous to sexual selection, which has molded the appearance, anatomy, and behavior of companion animal species

In: Society & Animals
Author: James Serpell

, anthro- pomorphism and its corollary, pet keeping, have obvious biolog- ical Žtness implications. On the animal side, anthropomorphism constitutes a unique evolutionar y selection pressure, analogous to sexual selection, which has molded the appearance, anatomy, and behavior of companion animal species

In: Society & Animals
Author: Carlos Drews

-and-large illegal and often involves endangered species. Costa Ricans, in a conservative estimate, keep about 151,288 par rots as pets. More than half the respondents have kept a psittacid at some point in their lives. Pet keeping is a common practice in Costa Rican society, and its incidence is high by

In: Society & Animals

cruelty and whose youthful cruelty had implications both for the future of family life and for the body politic. The practice of pet keeping, where children became stewards of companion animals who were then able to teach young humans such virtues as gratitude and fidelity, became a socially meaning- ful

In: Society & Animals
In recent decades the humanities and social sciences have undergone an ‘animal turn’, an efflorescence of interdisciplinary scholarship which is fresh and challenging because its practitioners consider humans as animals amongst other animals, while refusing to do so from an exclusively or necessarily biological point of view. Knowing Animals showcases original explorations of the ‘animal turn’ by new and eminent scholars in philosophy, literary criticism, art history and cultural studies. The essays collected here describe a lively bestiary of cultural organisms, whose flesh is (at least partly) conceptual and textual: paper tigers, beast fables, anthropomorphs, humanimals, l’animot. In so doing, they investigate the benefits of knowing animals differently: more closely, less definitively, more carefully, less certainly.
Contributors include: Laurence Simmons, Alphonso Lingis, Barbara Creed, Tanja Schwalm, Philip Armstrong, Annie Potts, Allan Smith, Ricardo De Vos, Catharina Landström, Brian Boyd, Helen Tiffin, Ian Wedde.

history. Answers to other ques- tions, such as “How smart are turtles?” or “Do turtles play?”, are purely anecdotal, indicating scope for further research. Much attention is given to interactions between humans and tur- tles, with topics ranging from pet-keeping, con- sumption, conservation, the roles of

In: Amphibia-Reptilia