Search Results

Series:

Edited by John J. Cleary and Gary Gurtler

With one exception, this volume contains papers and commentaries originally presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the 2004-5 academic year. Of the seven colloquia that make up this volume, two deal with Plato while the rest are dedicated to Aristotle. The topics on Plato are almost exclusively political: (1) a reading of the Republic that places it within the genre of writings ‘On the Politeia, and (2) a discussion of the role of preambles in Plato’s Laws. There is a wider range of topics on Aristotle, ranging from his views on the relationship between external goods and happiness, through his account of phantasia, and all the way to his theory of metaphor. In relation to Aristotle also, one colloquium provides a detailed analysis of his curious theory of the so-called ‘inner sense’, while another raises the question as to whether he might be regarded as a particularist in the philosophy of action like some modern theorists. As usual for this series, most colloquia contain a paper and commentary which provide a lively exchange on these topics.

Series:

Edited by John J. Cleary and Gary Gurtler

With one exception, this volume contains papers and commentaries originally presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the 2004-5 academic year. Of the seven colloquia that make up this volume, two deal with Plato while the rest are dedicated to Aristotle. The topics on Plato are almost exclusively political: (1) a reading of the Republic that places it within the genre of writings ‘On the Politeia, and (2) a discussion of the role of preambles in Plato’s Laws. There is a wider range of topics on Aristotle, ranging from his views on the relationship between external goods and happiness, through his account of phantasia, and all the way to his theory of metaphor. In relation to Aristotle also, one colloquium provides a detailed analysis of his curious theory of the so-called ‘inner sense’, while another raises the question as to whether he might be regarded as a particularist in the philosophy of action like some modern theorists. As usual for this series, most colloquia contain a paper and commentary which provide a lively exchange on these topics.

Particulars in Greek Philosophy

The seventh S.V. Keeling Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

Series:

Edited by Robert Sharples

Ancient Greek philosophy has been criticised, for example by the late Bernard Williams, for emphasising the universal at the expense of the particular. Six leading scholars consider what the Greeks themselves, from Plato to the period of the Roman Empire, had to say on this issue in the contexts of ethics, psychology, metaphysics and cosmology. Ancient views are compared with modern ones, and the influence of the former on the latter is considered.

Series:

Edited by Hava Tirosh-Samuelson and Aaron W. Hughes

This anthology of original essays reflects on the future of Jewish philosophy in light of the Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers (Brill, 2013-2018). The volume assesses the strengths of Jewish philosophy, explores the place of Jewish philosophy within the Western academy as a critique of and contribution to the discipline of philosophy, and showcases the relevance of Jewish philosophy to contemporary Jewish culture. The volume argues that Jewish philosophy is more vibrant, diverse, and culturally significant than its public image implies. Special attention is paid to the interdisciplinary nature of Jewish philosophy, the institutional settings for generating Jewish philosophy, and the contribution of philosophizing to contemporary Jewish self-understanding.

Series:

Edited by Bart Labuschagne and Timo Slootweg

No topic ever disquieted Hegel more than that of Religion. It haunted him, and he wrestled with it all during his life: from his brilliant youthful writings on spirit of Judaism and Christianity, up until the Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion of 1831. Of the ‘Determinate Religions’, Hegel wrote many profound and exhilarating philosophical interpretations. This volume brings together a collection of critical essays that discuss Hegel’s relation to each of these historical Religions, including the Islam, and (of course) the ‘revealed’ religion of Christianity (Catholicism and Protestantism). All chapters aim to shed light on the intriguing development of Hegel’s conception of the dialectic of Religion. Taken together, they develop a comprehensive view of Hegel’s philosophy of the historical Religions. His grandiose and provocative perceptions and ‘thought-scapes’ enhance the appetite for the - much needed - philosophical appreciation of the phenomenon of religion.

Series:

Dov Schwartz

This book deals with central issues of medieval Jewish philosophy. Among the subjects treated are divine immanence, the intellect, miracles, and esoteric writing and its limits. The work provides a new perspective on the history of Jewish philosophy in the Middle Ages. Relying on many as yet unpublished manuscripts, which enable it to offer new insights relating to such thinkers as Judah Halevi, Maimonides, and Gersonides, it also presents a new and original perception of the dynamics of Jewish thought in general.

Series:

Erzsébet Rózsa

In Modern Individuality in Hegel’s Practical Philosophy, Erzsébet Rózsa aims to reconstruct Hegel’s theory of individuality in the light of his idea of modernity. Modern individuality is one of the central topics of Hegel’s practical philosophy, discussed systematically in the forms of subjectivity in subjective, objective, and practical spirit. Hegel interpreted modern existence and lifeworld in the context of law, politics, economy, and private life. “Infinite subjective freedom” is the historical principle of the “modern age”, as well as the basic determination of modern individual forms of existence and knowledge. Modern form of life and mentality based on the values and practical actions of self-knowledge and self-determination is an achievement of historical significance. This radical turn, however, gives a new perspective to the problem of good life: the normative role of substantial values is overshadowed by the stabilizing function of the “objective order” of institutions.

Series:

Edited by Cinzia Arruzza and Dmitri Nikulin

Philosophy and Political Power in Antiquity is a collection of essays examining ancient philosophers' reflections on the connection between political power and philosophy. The ancient Greeks both invented political philosophy and were the first to conceptualize the implicit tension between political activity and the contemplative life as found in ideal political institutions and under conditions of repressive rule. These essays examine discussions of these issues within a wide variety of the major schools of antiquity from both interpretive and analytical perspectives. While providing novel approaches to ancient philosophical texts, this volume attests to the importance of political reflection, deliberation, and resistance for ancient thought, and to the enduring strength and relevance of these reflections for contemporary debates within political philosophy.

Islamic Philosophy, Science, Culture, and Religion

Studies in Honor of Dimitri Gutas

Series:

Edited by Felicitas Opwis and David Reisman

Islamic intellectual thought is at the center of this collection of articles honoring Dimitri Gutas by friends, colleagues, and former students. The essays cover three main areas: the classical heritage and Islamic culture; classical Arabic science and philosophy; and Muslim traditional sciences. They show the interconnectedness between the Islamic intellectual tradition and its historical predecessors of Greek and Persian provenance, ranging from poetry to science and philosophy. Yet, at the same time, the authors demonstrate the independence of Muslim scholarship and the rich inner-Muslim debates that brought forth a flourishing scholastic culture in the sciences, philosophy, literature, and religious sciences. This collection also reflects the breadth of contemporary research on the intellectual traditions of Islamic civilization.

Contributors include: Amos Bertolacci, Kevin van Bladel, Gideon Bohak, Sonja Brentjes, Charles Burnett, Hans Daiber, Gerhard Endress, William Fortenbaugh, Beatrice Gruendler, Jules Janssens, David King, Yahya Michot, Suleiman Mourad, Racha Omari, Felicitas Opwis, David Reisman, Heinrich von Staden, Tony Street, Hidemi Takahashi, Alexander Treiger, and Robert Wisnovsky.

Series:

Edited by Elizabeth Millán Brusslan and Judith Norman

Early German Romanticism has long been acknowledged as a major literary movement, but only recently have scholars appreciated its philosophical significance as well. This collection of original essays showcases not only the philosophical achievements of early German Romantic writers such as Friedrich Schlegel and Novalis, but also the sophistication, contemporary relevance, and wide-ranging influence of their philosophical contributions. This volume will be of interest both to students looking for an introduction to romanticism as well as to scholars seeking to discover new facets of the movement – a romantic perspective on topics ranging from mathematics to mythology, from nature to literature and language. This volume bears testimony to the enduring and persistent modernity of early German Romantic philosophy.