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Suzannie K. Y. Leung

* I would like to express my gratitude to Dr. Eva Chen for her comments on the early version of this paper. Introduction Some countries in the Asia-Pacific region have launched ‘free education’ policies for early childhood education ( ece ). It is interesting to note how different places in

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Rosemary Hollis

The remit for this essay is to reflect on the enterprise of policy research—what and who is it for, and why do it at all, especially in the face of political inaction? In this response, the underlying contention is that policy research is indeed an “enterprise,” certainly as conducted in North

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Foreign Policy

From Conception to Diplomatic Practice

Ernest Petrič

Foreign Policy: From Conception to Diplomatic Practice represents an original and important contribution to the study of foreign policy, uniquely framed by the experiences of small and new countries. Ambassador Ernest Petrič artfully brings together academic expertise and years of diplomatic experience to provide a thorough treatment of national and international environments, the foreign policy decision making process and an original analysis of the means of foreign policy and diplomacy. The role of the United Nations, the EU, strategic actors and the role of foreign policy as a diplomatic instrument are examined. Finally a reflection of the foreign policy concerns of small and new countries, with special attention to Slovenia and legal aspects are offered.

Foreign Policy: From Conception through Diplomatic Practice successfully integrates scholarly theory with empirical evidence. The book's clear and evocative style will appeal to foreign policy professionals, academics and students of diplomacy, international relations and international law.
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Edited by Kwen Fee Lian and Chee-Kiong Tong

Notwithstanding the lean years that followed 1986 and 1997, sustained economic growth since the late 1970s has propelled Singapore into the post-industrial age and reproduced the demographic and social structure of advanced western societies. The rapid shift to a knowledge-intensive economy requiring highly-skilled services has resulted in a 'two-speed' society consisting of a highly competitive but rewarding sector and a marginalized population that is increasingly at risk. Being avowedly anti-welfarist, the state for ideological reasons has resisted pressures to introduce a comprehensive welfare regime for its risk population, preferring to privilege its productive citizenry. Is Singapore a counter-factual to the convergence thesis, by preferring to put in place a social policy driven by the belief of its leaders that the more successful a society is the more it is able to care for those who fall behind?
Open Access

Dominic Npoanlari Dagbanja

of lives. 10 Investment promotion and protection agreements ( ippa s) may also have the effect of limiting the ability of states to make policies and laws required in the public interest and to implement them because “regulatory conduct in a wide range of fields – industrial development, taxation

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Edited by Sergio Carrera, Arie Pieter Leonhard den Hertog, Marion Panizzon and Dora Kostakopoulou

This collective volume draws on the themes of intersectionality and overlapping policy universes to examine and evaluate the shifting functions, frames and multiple actors and instruments of an ongoing and revitalized cooperation in EU external migration and asylum policies with third states. The contributions are based on problem-driven research and seek to develop bottom-up, policy-oriented solutions, while taking into account global, EU-based and local perspectives, and the shifting universes of EU migration, border and asylum policies. In 15 chapters, we explore the multifaceted dimensions of the EU external migration policy and its evolution in the post-crisis, geopolitical environment of the Global Compacts.
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Jackie Brien

the Scheme, and the intention is for the participant to have choice and control over their service provision ( NDIS , 2013b). For young children with disabilities, policy acknowledges, to some extent, that it may be the family who is the participant, yet this is not clearly defined. Also to be

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Edited by Harold Schiffman

The book was co-edited by Brian Spooner, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Language policy in Central Asia, Afghanistan and the immediately surrounding neighboring countries has a long and varied history. The Iranian revolution of 1978, the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan since 2001 have left the area in a state of flux. This volume gives a better picture about what is official and explicit, what is not official but implicit or general practice, and what the likely future developments might be. It is very clear that multilingualism, whether it involves Persian, Russian or English in addition to other languages, not only has long been a part of the scene, but will probably continue to be so.
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Edited by Sulochini Pather and Roger Slee

It is a fundamental right for all children to be given access to quality education to ensure they reach their full potential as individuals; a right which is reflected in international law in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and supported by the Education for All Agenda (1990) and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities and Optional Protocol (2006). Nation states across Africa have signed up to these protocols and remain committed to ensuring education for all children. The progress globally however in the past 25 years, including in Africa, has been slow (UNESCO, 2015). Questions remain on why this is so and what can be done about it. This book brings together researchers, education policy makers and academics from the African community. What is unique about this text is that it includes local insights narrated and critiqued by local professionals. This book presents a wide range of African countries across the continent, to provide a critical overview of the key issues affecting developments. It questions the origins of ideas and definitions around inclusive education and the impact it has made on policy and ultimately practice, within local socio-cultural and economic communities, both urban and rural. It highlights positive developments as well as challenges and provides a deep understanding of why the process of implementing inclusive education is so complex in the African continent. It provides an understanding of what is needed to develop a more sustainable model of inclusive education across the continent and within specific countries.
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Edited by Jody L. McBrien

Since 2014, the international community has felt overwhelmed by refugees and asylum seekers searching for opportunities in which to rebuild their lives. Indeed, large numbers can result in turmoil and concern in resettlement countries and with national citizens. A climate of fear can result, especially if perpetuated by politicians and media that suggest negative effects resulting from immigration. Caught in the crossfire of social and political disagreements about migration are children, most of whom are not included in decisions to leave their homelands. This edited book examines their academic challenges from the perspective of the six English-speaking refugee resettlement countries. Our hope is not only to compare challenges, but also to describe successes by which teachers and policymakers can consider new approaches to help refugee and asylum-seeking children. Educational Policies and Practises of English-Speaking Refugee Resettlement Countries offers perspectives from established and new scholars examining educational situations for refugees and asylum seekers. The top three resettlement countries are the United States, Canada, and Australia. For its size, New Zealand is also proportionately a country of high resettlement. New to resettlement are the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Thus, this collection includes wisdom from countries that began resettlement during World War Two as well as newcomers to the process. In 2018, UNHCR numbers of displaced people reached a record high of 68.5 million. Policymakers, teachers, social service providers, and the general public need to understand ways to help resettled become productive members in their new countries of residence.

Contributors are: Samantha Arnold, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Helen Baak, Sally Baker, Zhiyan Basharati, Briana Byers, Merike Darmody, Lucia Dore, Ain A. Grooms, Maria Hayward, Asher Hirsch, Amanda Hiorth, Caroline Lenette, Leslie Ann Locke, Duhita Mahatmya, Jody McBrien, Rory McDaid, Helen Murphy, Tara Ross, Jan Stewart, and Elizabeth P. Tonogbanua.