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-diplomatic impulses are on the rise again through a widespread populist challenge. In a markedly different way than nationalists, populists contest the international system as well as diplomacy and diplomats as constraining forces, part of a self-serving and controlling technocracy. 9 From the theoretical tradition

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

-diplomatic impulses are on the rise again through a widespread populist challenge. In a markedly different way than nationalists, populists contest the international system as well as diplomacy and diplomats as constraining forces, part of a self-serving and controlling technocracy. 9 From the theoretical tradition

In: Debating Public Diplomacy
Editor: Jure Vidmar
This volume focuses on the recent challenge posed by right-wing populism to democratic consolidation in Europe and particularly explores the legal dimensions of this challenge. Part One attempts to define political populism and explains why it poses a challenge to democratic political order in Europe. Part Two examines the theoretical underpinnings of the populist challenge to human rights and democracy in Europe. Part Three applies this theory to concrete examples and considers case studies including an old EU Member State, two newer EU Member States and a non-EU Member State party to the ECHR. The aim is to examin the consequences of the present populist challenge in Europe that has been marked with excessively nationalist policies in some states party to the ECHR. It is explored how the Convention rights have been undermined, but also what the limitations are of the ECHR acting as a safety-net for democratic consolidation in Europe.

. Although the ECtHR’s case law provides for some important judicial clarifications on the link between human rights and democracy, the populist challenge makes the balancing exercise between human rights and democratic standards increasingly difficult. Indeed, human rights and democracy do not always go

In: European Populism and Human Rights

them, only populist democracy is a genuine democracy true to its name. So my question is: Given the general conditions and capacities of contemporary liberal democracy, which has led to a number of populist challenges in the first place, is it realistic to expect liberal democracy to be able to cope

In: Populism

unification in one state of all Albanians in the Balkans’. 6 Finally, rba does not tolerate crime and puts a great emphasis on law and order. Considering the above-analysed Albanian party system, the rba is presented as a populist challenger to the well-established configurations of the party system

In: Southeastern Europe

order? The populist challenge in Europe has forced us to rethink our understandings of democratization in Europe. 5 While the end of the Cold War was marked with optimistic interpretations of a global switch to democracy, we are now faced with democratic regression. This is not only significant for new

In: European Populism and Human Rights

opposition but also for authoritarian incumbents. So, is Putin simply another kind of populist? And if he is not, what are then the regimeʼs prospects to respond to the populist challenge? In numerous commentaries and news stories the link between populist challengers in the Europe and USA – from Marine Le

In: Russian Politics

the Populist Challenges (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002); Federico Finchelstein, From Fascism to Populism in History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2017). 18 Pierre André Taguieff, “Political Science Confronts Populism: From a Conceptual Mirage to a Real Problem,” Telos 103

In: Populism