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In À l’ombre des grandes puissances de Mésopotamie. Une histoire du Sūhu à l’époque néo-assyrienne, Philippe Clancier studies the Sūhu region of the Euphrates river, on the border of Assyria and Babylonia. He reconstructs its geography by presenting the fauna and flora, and by identifying sites and the layout of traffic routes. After going back to the 2nd millennium BC to explain the origin of its main dynasty, he highlights the partition of Sūhu into two main kingdoms before its reunification in the 8th century BC and its later conquest by Assyria. Thanks to an interdisciplinary approach that combines written sources, archaeological data and travellers’ accounts, Philippe Clancier offers for the first time a history of this region in the neo-Assyrian period.

-dated inscriptions. The corpus of material in favor of shared power includes double-dated and co-naming stelae and other objects, literary texts, temple reliefs, religious inscriptions, architectural developments, control notes from key archaeological sites, and artistic qualities present in the royal statuary of

In: Visualizing Coregency

.1.1 Portraiture The development of our modern conception of portraiture portraiture is complex; this is not the place to present a full review of the documentation related to its evolution. However, it is possible to identify two main definitions, to which most discussion tends to adhere. The first definition

In: Visualizing Coregency

The previous chapters have presented both a comprehensive accounting of the evidence for the practice of coregency coregency during the 12th Dynasty and a synthesis of the full corpus of royal sculpture dating to the reigns of Senwosret III and Amenemhet III Amenemhet III . The epigraphic and

In: Visualizing Coregency

A number of important trends present in the royal sculpture of the early 12th Dynasty had a direct influence on the image of Senwosret III and Amenemhet III . With the exception of Senwosret I , a very limited number of objects have survived for each of the pharaohs in question, making it

In: Visualizing Coregency

Medamoud (pls. IX – X ). 12 However, it is more likely that the administration conceived of the statuary destined for the temple as a group and installed it as such to decorate the temple and its environs. While these authors presented a new explanation for the features of the statuary, they too

In: Visualizing Coregency

’s gaze. For example, colossal statues were constructed so that the viewer could fully understand the king’s image from a particular distance and angle; this focus on visual elements is also present in the architecture. 22 Evers has divided the known statuary into three chronological groups that he

In: Visualizing Coregency

importantly, to the political and administrative landscape. The analysis presented in Chapters Four through Six suggests that the stylistic evolution of the royal sculpture of the 12th Dynasty may have been significantly impacted by the political and religious components associated with the development of

In: Visualizing Coregency

-location of symbols on various surfaces, that Egypt’s pagan past was not that distant in time or place from its then Christian present. What became very clear was a sense of ownership of the symbol that allowed the artist or artisan to create something to his or her taste, and by extension perhaps that of

In: The Cross in the Visual Culture of Late Antique Egypt

the scholarship that is still present today. A brief overview of previous theories is essential for understanding the current state of the evidence and for drawing the most well-informed conclusion on this group of materials as a whole. Delia was the first to question seriously whether the presence

In: Visualizing Coregency