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Power, Politics and the Cults of Isis

Proceedings of the Vth International Conference of Isis Studies, Boulogne-sur-Mer, October 13-15, 2011

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Edited by Laurent Bricault and Miguel John Versluys

In the Hellenistic and Roman world intimate relations existed between those holding power and the cults of Isis. This book is the first to chart these various appropriations over time within a comparative perspective. Ten carefully selected case studies show that “the Egyptian gods” were no exotic outsiders to the Hellenistic and Roman Mediterranean, but constituted a well institutionalised and frequently used religious option. Ranging from the early Ptolemies and Seleucids to late Antiquity, the case studies illustrate how much symbolic meaning was made with the cults of Isis by kings, emperors, cities and elites. Three articles introduce the theme of Isis and the longue durée theoretically, simultaneously exploring a new approach towards concepts like ruler cult and Religionspolitik.

Eduard Iricinschi

convert Trypho and his friends to a version of Christian practices, palatable for a Jewish audience. The author justifies Justin’s choice of the heresiological discourse to appeal to Jews by presenting heresy not only as the fulfillment of a prophecy but also as similar, in its social structure, to the

Devin L. White

incense then he will combine equal amounts of pure frankincense, cinnamon, onyx, and myrrh according to the Law. These are the tetrad of the virtues: for if they are full and present in equal measure, the mind will not be betrayed. Ch. 2 Once purified by the fullness of the virtues, the soul prepares the

Clarifying the Eclipse

Ascetics, Politics, and the Poetics of Power in Post-Roman Iberia

David Ungvary

[…] I have addressed all these matters in a brief document, presenting them just as they were formulated by the scholars of antiquity and especially in the works of catholic authors. For to know the nature of these things is not superstitious knowledge, as long as they are investigated in accordance

Ian N. Mills

may consult the human soul. The case for the One True God need not appeal to philosophical training but to ordinary experience. While still relevant to the question at hand, Tertullian’s statement is not, as often presented, a straightforward description of exclusively internal readership. First

Willem J. C. Blom

Suetonius did not mean that Chrestus was present in Rome in 49 CE when writing “ impulsore Chresto ”. 19 For Orosius, who cites this passage and relates it to Christ, the word choice of Suetonius was apparently not a problem. Furthermore, it is very well possible that the source of Suetonius was mistaken

Jan N. Bremmer

present an exhaustive survey of early Lycaonian Christianity, based on both literary and, especially, non-literary sources. Its size, over 1000 pages, prevents me of course from a detailed discussion. Yet I will try to give an impression of this impressive book, which is unequalled in its thoroughness