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Politics and Resentment

Antisemitism and Counter-Cosmopolitanism in the European Union

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Edited by Lars Rensmann and Julius H. Schoeps

Democratic polities continue to be faced with politics of resentment. Along with resurgent counter-cosmopolitanism and anti-immigrant prejudice, various political agents have mobilized old and modernized antisemitism in European democracies. The first comparative study of its kind, this book rigorously examines the contemporary relevance of antisemitism and other politicized resentments in the context of the European Union and beyond. Presenting new approaches and state-of-the-art research by leading authorities in the field, the volume combines comparative work and political theorizing with ten single country studies using qualitative and quantitative data from Eastern and Western Europe. The result is a new and sober set of arguments and findings, demonstrating that antisemitism and counter-cosmopolitan resentment are still all too present human rights challenges in today’s cosmopolitan Europe.

The Lure of Anti-Semitism

Hatred of Jews in Present-Day France

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Michel Wieviorka

Since the beginning of the 21st century France has seen the return of anti-Semitism with attacks, desecration of cemeteries, insults, and threats. This book is the outcome of a survey carried out by Michel Wieviorka along with a dozen sociologists. He examines different tracks: the possible links between anti-Semitism and the presence of a considerable Muslim population in France, the hypothesis of a meeting between Islamism and the anti-Semitic extreme left, as well as the hypothesis whereby the rise of anti-Semitism is connected with the evolution of the Jewish population in France which is increasingly attracted by a community-oriented way of life.
This book demonstrates that present-day anti-Semitism owes as much to factors internal to French society (the social, institutional, and political crisis) as it does to the projection of global issues on French soil, in particular those which originate in the Middle East. He demonstrates that this phenomenon has novel aspects, but its more classical features are also borne in mind. This rigorous and objective book is the first scientific study of present-day French anti-Semitism.

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Eliezer Ben-Rafael, Olaf Glöckner and Yitzhak Sternberg

Since their recent dispersion from the former Soviet Union, Russian-speaking Jews (RSJ) have become the vast majority of Germany’s longstanding Jewry. An entity marked by permeable boundaries, they show a solidarity and commitment to world Jewry, including Israel, but feeble identification with their hosts. The identification with the larger Jewish community leads to a wide consensus concerning the importance of offering Jewish education to the young. The study presented here explores the influence of the RSJ community, their relationship with German speaking Jews, and the ways in which the RSJ identification with world Jewry influences Jewish education opportunities for the young. Utilizing surveys of the largest Jewish communities in Germany, interviews of leading public figures, and a comprehensive overview of the Jewish educational framework available in Germany, this book seeks to present a description and analysis of the Jewish population in Germany including its attitudes, activities, expectations, and identify formulations.

This book is also available in paperback.

Edited by Eliezer Ben-Rafael, Yosef Gorny and Judit Bokser Liwerant

This series brings together contributions addressing the question of the unity versus conflict, closeness versus alienation, and convergence versus divergence entrenched in the infinite variety of collective identities illustrated by Jews in this era. The titles included investigate—each volume under its own angle—the principles, narratives, visions and commands which constitute in different places the essentials of Jewishness. As a rule, they ask whether or not one is still allowed to speak, at the beginning of this new century, of one—single and singular—Jewish People. Hence, this series is a podium for researchers of Judaism and the Jewish condition all over the world—from Israel to the United States, and from there to Argentina and Brazil as well as Russia, Ukraine or France, England and Germany. These investigations should yield an understanding of how far Judaism is still one while Jewishness is multifarious. The perspectives offered may draw from sociology and the social sciences as well as from history and the humanities in general. This series aspires to constitute a meeting point for them all. It will be of interest not only to scholars in Jewish Studies but also to anyone interested in the theory and practice of major phenomena of our time like transnational diasporas, the globalization of ethnicity, and present-day relations of religiosity and laicity which, in one way or another, are akin to the preoccupations of researchers in the field of Jewish identities.

The series published an average of four volumes per year over the last 5 years.

The Jews of France Today

Identity and Values

Series:

Erik H. Cohen Z"l

Recent nation-wide surveys of the Jews of France yielded a detailed picture of this community, one of the largest Jewish Diaspora populations, with a long and rich history. This book presents results and analyses of this survey for the first time in English. Key issues explored include demographics, representations of Jewish identity, expressions of community solidarity, social issues, and values. Data was analyzed using multi-dimensional techniques, revealing underlying structural relationships and an axiological typology. The translation of the French edition was expanded for accessibility to an English-speaking audience, including a background on history, socio-political climate and related philosophical works. The cumulative result is the most up-to-date and comprehensive look at the Jews of France at the turn of the third millennium.

This book is also available in paperback.

"...the empirical centerpiece of Cohen’s study is sound, invaluable, and often highly illuminating. In the short space provided this reviewer could not fully do justice to the wealth of information presented there..." Ethan Katz, University of Cincinnati

The Call of the Homeland

Diaspora Nationalisms, Past and Present

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Edited by Allon Gal, Athena S. Leoussi and Anthony D. Smith

Confronting Allosemitism in Europe

The Case of Belgian Jews

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Eliezer Ben-Rafael

Only a few decades after the Holocaust, Belgian Jews, like most European Jewries, are under the attack of forces stemming from a variety of sources. How do they confront and stand these new hardships? Research done all over Europe from 2012 through 2013 tried to answer this question. Among the cases investigated, the Belgian Jewry is one of the most interesting. It is both versatile and representative, revealing essential components of the general experience of European Jews today. Conceptual considerations pave the way to the study of their plight that has been, by any criterion, anything but “usual". Belgian Jews, it appears, are “like” many other Jewries in Europe but “a little more”. They highlight the question: is allosemitism at all surmountable?

This book is also available in paperback.

Robert Singerman

Edited by David L. Gold

This work identifies and describes over 3,000 books, essays in books, and articles on Jewish given names and family names throughout history, spanning the Biblical period to modern times. The bibliography is a highly analytic one, recording published materials in a wide variety of research languages treating Jewish anthroponymy in the broadest sense from historical, sociological, and linguistic perspectives. The bibliography will be an invaluable resource for any researcher engaged in etymological studies, Jewish intralinguistics, or Jewish family history.

A Road to Nowhere?

Jewish Experiences in Unifying Europe

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Edited by Julius H. Schoeps and Olaf Glöckner

Europe is in the midst of a rapid political and economic unification. What does this mean for the Jewish minority – numbering less than 2 million people and still suffering from the aftermath of the Shoah? Will the Jewish communities participate in Europe’s bold venture without risking total assimilation? Are they vibrant enough to form a new Jewish center alongside Israel and the American Jewish community, or are they hopelessly divided and on a “Road to Nowhere”?

Different perspectives are predicted, relating to demographical, cultural and sociological aspects. This volume provides exciting, thorough and controversial answers by renowned scholars from Europe, Israel, North- and Latin America – many of them also committed to local Jewish community building.

This book is also available in paperback.

Between Feminism and Orthodox Judaism

Resistance, Identity, and Religious Change in Israel

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Yael Israel-Cohen

In Between Feminism and Orthodox Judaism, Yael Israel-Cohen offers an analysis of the activism and identity of women considered at the forefront of the feminist challenge to Orthodoxy. Through a look at women’s battle over synagogue ritual and the ordination of women rabbis, an intricate and complex picture of identity, resistance, and religious change is revealed. Some of the central questions that Yael Israel-Cohen explores are: How do modern Orthodox women strategize to implement feminist changes? How do they deal with what at least on the surface seem to be conflicting allegiances? How do they perceive their role as agents of change and what are the ramifications of their activism for how we understand the boundaries of Orthodoxy more generally?

This book is also available in paperback.

"Between Feminism and Orthodox Judaism represents an interpretive study at its finest. It is well-written, theoretically sophisticated, and grounded within the literature. I highly recommend this book for scholars and nonscholars alike who are interested in studies of women’s resistance in conservative settings." Faezeh Bahreini, University of South Florida, Tampa