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Editors: Jan Melissen and Jian Wang
This book is a much-needed update on our understanding of public diplomacy. It intends to stimulate new thinking on what is one of the most remarkable recent developments in diplomatic practice that has challenged practitioners as much as scholars. Thought-leaders and up-and-coming authors in Debating Public Diplomacy agree that official efforts to create and maintain relationships with publics in other societies encounter unprecedented and often unexpected difficulties. Resurgent geo-strategic rivalry and technological change affecting state-society relations are among the factors complicating international relationships in a much more citizen-centric world. This book discusses today’s most pressing public diplomacy challenges, including recent sharp power campaigns, the rise of populism, the politicization of diaspora relations, deep-rooted nation-state-based perspectives on culture, and public diplomacy’s contribution to counterterrorism. With influential academic voices exploring policy implications for tomorrow, this collection of essays is also forward-looking by examining unfolding trends in public diplomacy strategies and practices.

Originally published as Volume 14, Nos. 1-2 (2019) pp. 1-197 in Brill’s journal The Hague Journal of Diplomacy.

Introduction 1 The purpose of this article is to consider public diplomacy’s future, as seen through the prism of public diplomacy between hostile nations. The focus is on democratic states in hostile, or adversarial, relations with non-democratic states. In such adversarial diplomatic

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Introduction 1 The purpose of this article is to consider public diplomacy’s future, as seen through the prism of public diplomacy between hostile nations. The focus is on democratic states in hostile, or adversarial, relations with non-democratic states. In such adversarial diplomatic

In: Debating Public Diplomacy
Author: Kejin Zhao

Public Diplomacy and the China Model Public diplomacy has been an increasingly hot topic since the early twenty-first century, because of the 9/11 attacks in 2001 and the United States’ public diplomacy response. Although the Communist Party of China ( CPC ) has always conducted such

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

-reaching implications for the way in which individuals, communities and societies define and conduct themselves as social and political actors, and, by extension, for the way in which public diplomacy as a practice of building bridges with foreign publics will adapt and evolve in the digital age. Drawing on social

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author: Kejin Zhao

Public Diplomacy and the China Model Public diplomacy has been an increasingly hot topic since the early twenty-first century, because of the 9/11 attacks in 2001 and the United States’ public diplomacy response. Although the Communist Party of China ( CPC ) has always conducted such activities as

In: Debating Public Diplomacy

-reaching implications for the way in which individuals, communities and societies define and conduct themselves as social and political actors, and, by extension, for the way in which public diplomacy as a practice of building bridges with foreign publics will adapt and evolve in the digital age. Drawing on social

In: Debating Public Diplomacy
Author: Yiwei Wang

believe that China will become the largest global economy within ten years, which creates a certain ‘anxiety over when China will rule the world’. Some international media, such as the Financial Times , even state that Chinese public diplomacy is doomed to failure. 2 It is within this broader

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Introduction 1 Public diplomacy has until recently been framed through a number of interrelated progressive lenses. As a model, public diplomacy is interpreted as an advance on traditional statecraft associated with a closed culture. Rather than an exclusively inter-state approach, ample

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Introduction 1 Public diplomacy has until recently been framed through a number of interrelated progressive lenses. As a model, public diplomacy is interpreted as an advance on traditional statecraft associated with a closed culture. Rather than an exclusively inter-state approach, ample space is

In: Debating Public Diplomacy