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Author: Frank Ankersmit

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/187226310X536222 Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2010) 375–409 brill.nl/jph Representation and Reference Frank Ankersmit University of Groningen f.r.ankersmit@rug.nl Abstract This essay focuses on the historical text as a whole. It does

In: Journal of the Philosophy of History
Author: Eugen Zeleňák

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/187226310X536213 Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2010) 354–374 brill.nl/jph On Sense, Reference, and Tone in History Eugen Zeleňák Catholic University in Ružomberok, Slovakia eugen.zelenak@ku.sk Abstract This paper tries to show how the

In: Journal of the Philosophy of History
Author: Luisa Valente

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156853411X590435 Vivarium 49 (2011) 50-74 brill.nl/viv v i va r i um Praedicaturi supponimus . Is Gilbert of Poitiers’ approach to the problem of linguistic reference a pragmatic one? * Luisa Valente Università di Roma “La Sapienza” Abstract The

In: Vivarium
Author: Chen Xiaoping

Frege argued that a predicate was a functional expression and the reference of it a concept, which as a predicative function had one or more empty places and was thus incomplete. Frege’s view gives rise to what has been known as the paradox of the concept “horse.” In order to resolve this paradox, I argue for an opposite view which retains the point that a predicate is a function, i.e. that a predicative function is complete in a sense. Specifically speaking, a predicate performing the function of a predicate has at least one empty place and has no reference, while a predicate performing the function of a subject does not have any empty place but does have a reference. Frege not only regarded a concept with one or more empty places as the reference of a predicate but also took a set of objects without any empty place to be the extension of a concept with one or more empty places. Thus, it presents a complex relationship between the reference of a predicate and its corresponding extension, leading to disharmony in his theory. I argue that this is because there is a major defect in Frege’s theory of meaning, namely the neglect of common names. What he called extensions of concepts are actually extensions of common names, and the references of predicates and the extensions of common names have a substantial difference despite being closely related.

In: Frontiers of Philosophy in China
Author: Sanja Ivic
This book investigates the importance of Ricoeur’s hermeneutics and poetics in rethinking humanities. In particular, Ricoeur’s insights on reference as refiguration and his idea of interpretation as a triadic process (which consists of mimesis 1 – prefiguration, mimesis 2 – configuration, and mimesis 3 – refiguration) will be applied to philosophy of science and to literary and historical texts. It will be shown that Ricoeur’s idea of emplotment can be extended and applied to scientific, literary and historical texts. This multidisciplinary research will include philosophy of science, metaphysics, hermeneutics, and literary theory.