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This paper centers on tonal representation of Chinese Wenzhou dialect. Tonal behaviors in Wenzhou indicate that tone is on an independent tier to the segment. Also, because of the complex of register and contour, Chinese tones have been represented with a structure of two dimensions, i.e. register and contour. However, these representations present an insolvable dilemma when analyzing the tonal behavior of Wenzhou dialect. Noticing that tone sandhi in Wenzhou is totally blind to register, we will propose that register is not an underlying feature for Wenzhou tone. We will further suggest that it is the initial consonant that carries the feature of register. This paper will conclude that the tonal representation of Wenzhou dialect has only one level, the tonal contour is formed by concatenation of level tones, and initial consonants carry the burden of meaning distinction that “tonal register” is supposed to carry.

In: Bulletin of Chinese Linguistics
Author: Takako TODA

This paper examines the nature of ‘tone spreading’ in Daishan , a northern Wu dialect of Chinese, from the viewpoint of acoustic phonetics. It compares the mean falling fundamental frequency (FO) contour of disyllabic lexical items with that of monosyllabic citation forms in order to investigate if they are the same. The result shows that they are nearly identical, and therefore, demonstrates phonetic tone spreading as well as phonological tone spreading

Acoustic data from Mende (Kupa Mende : Sierra Leone) are then presented and contrasted with those of Daishan. It is shown that the contouricity of the F О in fact differs between these two varieties. This result brings into question the autosegmentally based representation of tones using non-contour features such as HL, which has been commonly applied to the analysis of Wu tone sandhi. Finally, it is suggested that unitary contour features of tone, such as [falling], be applied in the case of Daishan tone spreading.

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale
Author: Hang Zhang

way to acquire the intonation system. Let us now turn to general suggestions on how to learn Chinese tones and Chinese sounds as a whole. 7.1.2 From the Establishment of the Mental Representation of Tones to Motor Skills As discussed in Chapter 1, Chinese tones do not function individually. Rather

In: Second Language Acquisition of Mandarin Chinese Tones

-tsang and the Far East, par Louis FINOT. Refutation des hypotheses invraisemblables proposges par M. Padmanath Bhattacharya dans le nO de janvier du J.R.A.S. - P. 453-479: On the Representation of Tones Oriental Languages, par Sir George GRISRSON, Cet ingénieux syst?me sera employg avec avantage dans les

In: T'oung Pao

presentation format of the five-scale model (Chao 1930), two independent features of height and contour (Wang 1967), and a new tonal parameter of register, defined exclusively and exhaustively by phonation types (Zhu 2012a). This model gives a more accurate representation of tone than Chao's five-scale model

In: Cahiers de Linguistique Asie Orientale

). Music-melody perception in tone-language and non-tone-language speakers . Psycholinguistic representation of tone . Hong Kong. http://www.sfu. ca/~ jaa37/index files/Alexander et al . Bedny , M. , Richardson , H. , & Saxe , R. ( 2015 ). “Visual” cortex responds to spoken language in blind

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture
Author: Hang Zhang

Tone Variations While the phonological representation of tone in a tonal language is consistent across speakers and contexts, the phonetic realization or F0 contour of a tone can be affected by many factors, and especially varies in connected speech. For example, consonant voicing, aspiration, vowel

In: Second Language Acquisition of Mandarin Chinese Tones
Author: Hang Zhang

produced somewhere near the high end of each individual Mandarin speaker’s pitch range. No matter how variable the phonetic realization is, the underlying phonological tone targets should remain constant. 1.2 Chinese Tone Variations While the phonological representation of tone in a tonal language is

In: Second Language Acquisition of Mandarin Chinese Tones
Author: Jean Lowenstamm

trilitères fortes. In Semitic Studies in Memory of Rev. Dr. Alexander Kohut , ed. George Alexander Kohut, 354–362. Berlin: S. Calvary. Leben, W. 1977. The Representation of Tone. In Tone: a Linguistic Survey , ed. V. Fromkin, 177– 219. New York: Academic Press. Leslau, W. 1950. Ethiopic Documents: Gurage

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics