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Critical Studies of Forgotten Places
The major aim of this series is to bring rural education and rural existence back into critical conversations. There is overwhelming attention in scholarly publications in education on urban areas in most cases to the exclusion of rural education. It is crucial that we take a critical look at rural education not only in the United States but internationally to understand the necessity of analyzing the class, race, gender, LGBTQ, issues involved in rural schooling and its environment. Not only rural schooling should be analyzed specifically but its relationship to rural culture and the ways in which media contributes to and forms people’s understandings and views of the rural.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to Assistant Editor Evelien van der Veer.

Series cover image is titled Moncure, North Carolina school house k-12 by Frank Bird III.
Author: Edwin Jurriëns

Abstract

This article analyses explorations of social and environmental problems and solutions in artistic representations of the Indonesian countryside and rural society, culture, and wisdom. It focuses on urban–rural creative collaborations that combine traditional culture and knowledge with modern technology and media, such as drones and the Internet, to empower local communities, promote artistic innovation, and enhance environmental sustainability. It seeks to demonstrate that contemporary art and media strengthen the urban–rural network and the accessibility and exchange of creative ideas and information. At the same time, the author argues that some of the causes of cultural conflict and anthropogenic disaster are embedded in forms of audio-visual representation itself. The display of urban–rural encounters in art festivals and social media can even instigate new forms of surveillance, and power and knowledge hierarchies, or reinforce regimes of consumer culture, partially responsible for the very problems the audio-visual representations and collaborations seek to address.

In: Greater Magadha
In: The Dead Sea Scrolls at Qumran and the Concept of a Library
Rural and Regional Motifs in the Contemporary European Novel
The human condition in rural, provincial locations is once again gaining status as a subject of European ‘high fiction’, after several decades in which it was dismissed on aesthetic and ideological grounds. This volume is one of the first attempts to investigate perspectives on local cultures, values and languages both systematically and in a European context. It does so by examining the works of a variety of authors, including Hugo Claus, Llamazares, Bergounioux and Millet, Buffalino and Consolo, and also several Soviet authors, who paint a grim picture of a collectivized – and thus ossified – rurality. How do these themes relate to the ongoing trend of globalization? How do these works, which are often experimental, connect – in their form, topics, language and ideological subtext – to the traditional rural or regional genres? Far from naively celebrating a lost Eden, most of these ‘new Georgics’ reflect critically on the tensions in contemporary, peripheral, rural or regional cultures, to the point of parodying the traditional topoi and genres. This book is of interest to those wishing to reflect on the dynamics and conflicts in contemporary European rural culture.
Author: R. Suwandi
This book is a remarkable study of a contemporary Javanese millenarian community based on a careful and nuanced exposition of the ideas of this community and its leader, Embah Wali, who looked to the coming of the Just King (Ratu Adil) in the person of the Sultan of Yogya. In the Blitar region (East Java), where the community is centred, Embah Wali and his followers created a world in which wayang functioned as the basis for an interpretation of living and being in the world.
Adept in linguistic manipulation of the Javanese language, Embah Wali and his disciples created a world of meaning that was unique to their community.
The author tells the story of Embah Wali and his followers, describes the phases of their movement and relates these developments to the turbulent social and political events that have occured in Java over more than a half century from the 1930s through the 1980s. This first-hand study of a Javanese messianistic movement contributes to our understanding of Javanese rural culture and politics. As a Javanese from Blitar, Raharjo Suwandi was fortunately positioned to be able able to study and interpret this movement in the midst of its most lively period and then to follow its development to the death of its founder.
Author: Meir Shahar

primacy of drama in Chinese rural culture. Plays were the centerpiece of all religious festivals. Performed in temple courtyards they introduced their spectators to the heroes and villains of Chinese history as well as the gods and demons of its religious lore. Permanent theater stages were established in

In: T'oung Pao
Author: Bernhard Struck

This essay tackles the problem of spatial imaginations, representations, and "mental maps." Its main point of reference is Larry Wolff's thesis that the division of Europe into an Eastern - backward and uncivilized - part, on the one hand, and a Western - modem and civilized - part, on the other, can be traced back to the late-eighteenth century. In the Enlightenment, according to Wolff, philosophers, writers, and above all travelers created this normative and value laden inner-European dichotomy. From the perspective of German travelogues on Poland and France published between roughly 1750 and 1850, Europe and its inner division appears in a completely different light. The perceptions, for instance, of travel infrastructure, rural life, and small provincial towns are widely identical. From the perspective of a bourgeois, educated, mostly Protestant traveier, originating from an urban background, the main dichotomy around 1800 was not the division between Eastern and Western Europe. The cleavages followed the division between urban and rural culture, bourgeois and peasant milieu, or between denominations, such as Protestantism and Catholicism.

In: East Central Europe
Author: BERNHARD STRUCK

Abstract: This essay tackles the problem of spatial imaginations, representations, and "mental maps." Its main point of reference is Larry Wolff's thesis that the division of Europe into an Eastern - backward and uncivilized - part, on the one hand, and a Western - modem and civilized - part, on the other, can be traced back to the late-eighteenth century. In the Enlightenment, according to Wolff, philosophers, writers, and above all travelers created this normative and value laden inner-European dichotomy. From the perspective of German travelogues on Poland and France published between roughly 1750 and 1850, Europe and its inner division appears in a completely different light. The perceptions, for instance, of travel infrastructure, rural life, and small provincial towns are widely identical. From the perspective of a bourgeois, educated, mostly Protestant traveler, originating from an urban background, the main dichotomy around 1800 was not the division between Eastern and Western Europe. The cleavages followed the division between urban and rural culture, bourgeois and peasant milieu, or between denominations, such as Protestantism and Catholicism.

In: East Central Europe
The Dead Sea Scrolls at Qumran and the Concept of a Library presents twelve articles by renowned experts in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran studies. These articles explore from various angles the question of whether or not the collection of manuscripts found in the eleven caves in the vicinity of Khirbet Qumran can be characterized as a “library,” and, if so, what the relation of that library is to the ruins of Qumran and the group of Jews that inhabited them. The essays fall into the following categories: the collection as a whole, subcollections within the overall corpus, and the implications of identifying the Qumran collection as a library.