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Sara Fani

tradition, developing new writing styles and employing specific scribal practices that can be distinguished according to their geographic origin or functional employment. This article presents a preliminary overview of particular scribal features attested in select Arabic manuscript collections from the

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Edited by John J. Collins and Ananda Geyser-Fouché

This volume contains 17 essays on the subjects of text, canon, and scribal practice. The volume is introduced by an overview of the Qumran evidence for text and canon of the Bible. Most of the text critical studies deal with texts from the Dead Sea Scrolls, including sectarian as well as canonical texts. Two essays shed light on the formation of authoritative literature. Scribal practice is illustrated in various ways, again mostly from the Dead Sea Scrolls. One essay deals with diachronic change in Qumran Hebrew. Rounding out the volume are two thematic studies, a wide-ranging study of the “ambiguous oracle” of Josephus, which he identifies as Balaam’s oracle, and a review of the use of female metaphors for Wisdom.

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Emanuel Tov

1 A Qumran Scribal Practice My book Scribal Practices mainly provides descriptions of data, with little theory. Some of these descriptions offer my personal views, such as my suggestion that certain scrolls were luxury scrolls. 2 I also go into much detail about measurements, tefillin, the

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Martin Abegg

to the features of Emanuel Tov’s Qumran Scribal Practice ( QSP ). 10 In essence I had rediscovered QSP by an independent means. Full orthography: כול Full orthography: לוא Full orthography: ירושלים Full orthography: דויד Full orthography: מושה Full orthography: זאות Full orthography: כיא

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Volume-editor John J. Collins and Ananda Geyser-Fouché

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Emanuel Tov

This monograph is written in the form of a handbook on the scribal features of the texts found in the Judean Desert (the Dead Sea Scrolls). It deals in detail with the material, shape, and preparation of the scrolls; scribes and scribal activity; scripts, writing conventions, errors and their correction, scribal signs; scribal traditions; differences between different types of scrolls (e.g., biblical and non-biblical scrolls), the possible existence of scribal schools, such as that at Qumran. In most categories, the analysis is meant to be exhaustive. The detailed analysis is accompanied by tens of tables as well as annotated illustrations and charts of scribal signs. The findings have major implications for the study of the scrolls and the understanding of their relationship to scribal traditions in Israel and elsewhere.

Dead Sea Media

Orality, Textuality, and Memory in the Scrolls from the Judean Desert

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Shem Miller

In Dead Sea Media Shem Miller offers a groundbreaking media criticism of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Although past studies have underappreciated the crucial roles of orality and memory in the social setting of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Miller convincingly demonstrates that oral performance, oral tradition, and oral transmission were vital components of everyday life in the communities associated with the Scrolls. In addition to being literary documents, the Dead Sea Scrolls were also records of both scribal and cultural memories, as well as oral traditions and oral performance. An examination of the Scrolls’ textuality reveals the oral and mnemonic background of several scribal practices and literary characteristics reflected in the Scrolls.