Search Results

Gentry R. McCreary and Joshua W. Schutts

, Pomerantz, Pommer, Ritt, Miller, and McCormick (2005). Cimino (2011) advanced three sociological macro-theories that have been used to explain organizational hazing: solidarity, commitment, and social dominance. Cimino synthesizes those macro-theories into one evolutionary theory of hazing – that hazing is

Daniel Hummel

size of the Muslim population. It is assumed based on theories grounded in social identity, intergroup conflict and social dominance that the size of the Muslim population may be incentivizing hate group creation and membership. This is due to the perceived threats to the membership of these groups by

Terra Ziporyn and Martha K. McClintock

PASSING AS AN INDICATOR OF SOCIAL DOMINANCE AMONG FEMALE WILD AND DOMESTIC NORWAY RATS by TERRA ZIPORYN and MARTHA K. McCLINTOCK1)2) (Department of Psychology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 11-II-1991) Introduction In many species living in

Richard C. Francis

THE EFFECTS OF BIDIRECTIONAL SELECTION FOR SOCIAL DOMINANCE ON AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR AND SEX RATIOS IN THE PARADISE FISH (MACROPODUS OPERCULARIS) by RICHARD C. FRANCIS1) (Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 U.S.A.) (With 2

D.D. Cole and J.N. Shafer

A STUDY OF SOCIAL DOMINANCE IN CATS by D. D. COLE and J. N. SHAFER (West Virginia University, U.S.A.) In recent years the attention of many investigators of animal behavior has been focused on the study of social behavior among lower animals, particu- larly dominance-submission relationships

G. Sander Van Doorn, Franz Weissing and Geerten Hengeveld

THE EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL DOMINANCE II: MULTI-PLAYER MODELS by G. SANDER VAN DOORN 1) , GEERTEN M. HENGEVELD and FRANZ J. WEISSING 2) (Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, Kerklaan 30, 9751 NN Haren, The Netherlands) (Acc. 26-V-2003) Summary The social

Fero, Moore, Jourdie and Simon

Consequences of social dominance on crayfish resource use K. Fero , J.L. Simon , V. Jourdie , & P.A. Moore 1) (Laboratory for Sensory Ecology, J.P. Scott Center for Neuroscience, Mind & Behaviour, Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403, USA

Geerten Hengeveld, G. Sander Van Doorn and Franz Weissing

THE EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL DOMINANCE I: TWO-PLAYER MODELS by G. SANDER VAN DOORN 1) , GEERTEN M. HENGEVELD and FRANZ J. WEISSING 2) (Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, Kerklaan 30, 9751 NN Haren, The Netherlands) (Acc. 26-V-2003) Summary A difference in

A.V.M. Canário, T. Keller-Costa, O.S. Lopes, O. Almeida, P.C. Hubbard, A. Iacovella, E.N. Barata and M. Lima

suggested. Keywords social dominance, chemical communication, urine signals, urinary bladder, muscle, aggres- sion, Oreochromis mossambicus . 1. Introduction In many terrestrial mammals, the release of urinary signals which are de- tected by conspecifics plays an essential role in the communication of so

John E. Dillon and Dennis L. Clark

SOCIAL DOMINANCE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PREVIOUSLY UNACQUAINTE MALE AND FEMALE SQUIRREL MONKEY by DENNIS L. CLARK and JOHN E. DILLON 1) (Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.) (Ree.20-V-1973) Social dominance relationships among squirrel monkeys have been pre