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Behaviour 150 (2013) 713–735 brill.com/beh Two studies on the interplay between social preferences and individual biological features S. Sanchez-Pages a , b , ∗ and E. Turiegano c a Department of Economic Theory, University of Barcelona, Avenida Diagonal 690, 08034 Barcelona, Spain b School of

In: Behaviour

). Learned social preference in zebrafish . — Curr. Biol. 14 : 881 - 884 . Farr J.A. ( 1977 ). Male rarity or novelty, female choice behaviour, and sexual selection in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata Peters (Pisces: Poecilidae) . — Evolution 31 : 162 - 168 . Ferrari S. Chatain

In: Behaviour

Uncovering sources of variation in female sociality: Implications for the development of social preferences in female cowbirds ( Molothrus ater ) S. Grace Freed-Brown , Andrew P. King , Jennifer L. Miller & Meredith J. West 1) (Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, 1101 E. 10 th St

In: Behaviour

eliminating male-male competition and mate guarding. MMM occurred in 55% of 47 trials. Females mated most often with males with whom they spent the most time, thus social preference was a good predictor of sexual preference. The tendency to mate with multiple males increased over time, thus the length of time

In: Behaviour

with infants. A second model, which took into account these age changes and sex differences in reactivity, but ignored the possibility of social preferences and assumed that interactions could be predicted from the overall reactivity or sociability of the monkeys involved, was also inadequate to

In: Behaviour
Author: A. Röell

were recorded. However, since my aim was to study the social preferences of jackdaws on an individual basis, only a fraction of these data was useful. For instance, when two or more birds arrived at the feeding pit simul- taneously, or more than one was already present at the feeding pit, it was

In: Behaviour

Abstract

Bonobos are the only ape species, other than humans, that have demonstrated prosocial behaviors toward groupmates and strangers. However, bonobos have not been tested in the most frequently used test of prosociality in animals. The current study tested the other-regarding preferences of bonobos in two experiments using the prosocial choice task. In the first experiment subjects preferred a food option that would benefit both themselves and another bonobo. This preference was likely the result of a location bias developed in the pretest since they showed the same preference in the non-social control condition within test sessions. A second experiment was designed to help subjects overcome this bias that might interfere with their social choices. Bonobos again did not prefer to choose the prosocial option. However, results suggest constraints of this paradigm in revealing social preferences. In discussing our results we consider why bonobos show robust prosocial preferences in other paradigms but not here. While others have suggested that such contradictory results might suggest interesting motivational or cognitive differences between humans and non-humans, we propose that the current ‘standard’ paradigm has failed validation due to three methodological constraints. Across the dozens of studies completed few have demonstrated that non-human subjects understand the causal properties of the apparatus, non-social biases quickly develop in inadequately counterbalanced pretests that typically explain subjects’ choices in the test, and even human children found this choice task too cognitively demanding to consistently show prosocial preferences. We suggest it is time to consider switching to a variety of more powerful and valid measures.

In: Bonobo Cognition and Behaviour

Bonobos are the only ape species, other than humans, that have demonstrated prosocial behaviors toward groupmates and strangers. However, bonobos have not been tested in the most frequently used test of prosociality in animals. The current study tested the other-regarding preferences of bonobos in two experiments using the prosocial choice task. In the first experiment subjects preferred a food option that would benefit both themselves and another bonobo. This preference was likely the result of a location bias developed in the pretest since they showed the same preference in the non-social control condition within test sessions. A second experiment was designed to help subjects overcome this bias that might interfere with their social choices. Bonobos again did not prefer to choose the prosocial option. However, results suggest constraints of this paradigm in revealing social preferences. In discussing our results we consider why bonobos show robust prosocial preferences in other paradigms but not here. While others have suggested that such contradictory results might suggest interesting motivational or cognitive differences between humans and non-humans, we propose that the current ‘standard’ paradigm has failed validation due to three methodological constraints. Across the dozens of studies completed few have demonstrated that non-human subjects understand the causal properties of the apparatus, non-social biases quickly develop in inadequately counterbalanced pretests that typically explain subjects’ choices in the test, and even human children found this choice task too cognitively demanding to consistently show prosocial preferences. We suggest it is time to consider switching to a variety of more powerful and valid measures.

In: Behaviour

opportunity to establish new social preferences. Throughout the year we observed social behaviour and social preferences, especially focussing upon the reproductive season. The first pair-bond was established in 1978, the first eggs were laid in 1979, and the first offspring from captive parents was raised in

In: Behaviour