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Author: Henry Jones

1 Introduction: Defining Statesmanship 1 We have a great many politicians in the country, perhaps as many as the country requires. I should not wish to ask for a larger supply of these ; but there is a wide difference between the politician and the statesman. A politician, for example

Open Access
In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
Author: David Lowe

nineteenth century to the early part of the twentieth the study of history was held by leading historians such as J.R. Seeley as a desirable form of schooling in statesmanship. Both parts of the compound noun, ‘states’ and ‘man’ now seem far too partial and exclusionary to constitute the desirable outcome of

In: Journal of Applied History
Author: Kristin Sampson

thus asserts the significance of the portrayal of the political art of statesmanship as weaving, and attempts to show how this image of weaving opens up specific conceptions of the political art of statesmanship. This is connected to two main aspects: Firstly, I maintain that the image of weaving also

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

an extreme, asking about the number of people that can be involved in perfect statesmanship in a given state is asking whether political power can be broadly shared (whether we call that broad base politeia , democracy, or something else), or whether – and if so, why – Plato’s Statesman rules out

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

In the Gorgias, Plato explores the relationship between statesmanship and rhetoric. Socrates argues that the true statesman uses the true rhetoric in the attempt to make others better through speeches. In the conversation with Gorgias, Socrates forces him to see the potentially disastrous consequences of teaching a kind of rhetoric that is morally neutral, which suggests the need for an uncompromisingly true or just rhetoric. In the exchange with Polus, Socrates attempts the just reformation of rhetoric into true rhetoric to counter the unjust rhetoric of Polus. In his discussion with Callicles, Socrates uses the true rhetoric to try to moderate him, but his failure reveals the limits of true statesmanship. By examining these three exchanges, I shed light on a unique and neglected paradox of the Gorgias. As clearly as the dialogue articulates what constitutes a true statesman, it challenges his own practice. Socrates, as the true statesman possessing the true rhetoric, is powerless to achieve his goals. However, a potential way to expand the success of the true statesman can be seen by going back to the discourse between Socrates and Gorgias and forging an alliance between them.

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

A Stranger’s Knowledge: Statesmanship, Philosophy and Law in Plato’s Statesman For many, the challenge of the Statesman is to make coherent all that the Eleatic Stranger says about ruling the city. Xavier Marquez takes up that challenge with the goal of uncovering a still relevant political

Open Access
In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition
In: The Statesman in Plutarch's Works, Volume I: Plutarch's Statesman and his Aftermath: Political, Philosophical, and Literary Aspects