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1 Introduction: Defining Statesmanship 1 We have a great many politicians in the country, perhaps as many as the country requires. I should not wish to ask for a larger supply of these ; but there is a wide difference between the politician and the statesman. A politician, for example

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In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
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nineteenth century to the early part of the twentieth the study of history was held by leading historians such as J.R. Seeley as a desirable form of schooling in statesmanship. Both parts of the compound noun, ‘states’ and ‘man’ now seem far too partial and exclusionary to constitute the desirable outcome of

In: Journal of Applied History
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The present paper is the third part of a triptych of recent papers of mine devoted to exploring Plato’s conception of statesmanship as a prescriptive art, supervising specific tekhnai which are subordinate to it and whose actions are necessary to fulfill the statesman’s main objective, the

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
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thus asserts the significance of the portrayal of the political art of statesmanship as weaving, and attempts to show how this image of weaving opens up specific conceptions of the political art of statesmanship. This is connected to two main aspects: Firstly, I maintain that the image of weaving also

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In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

TRUE STATESMANSHIP AS TRUE RHETORIC IN PLATO’S GORGIAS Christopher Whidden1 Abstract: In the Gorgias, Plato explores the relationship between statesmanship and rhetoric. Socrates argues that the true statesman uses the true rhetoric in the attempt to make others better through speeches. In the

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

an extreme, asking about the number of people that can be involved in perfect statesmanship in a given state is asking whether political power can be broadly shared (whether we call that broad base politeia , democracy, or something else), or whether – and if so, why – Plato’s Statesman rules out

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In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
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STATESMANSHIP IN A MINOR KEY? Michael Trapp Plutarch’s An seni respublica gerenda sit and Praecepta gerendae reipublicae are rightly prized as giving a rare insider’s view of day-to-day politics in the Greek cities of the Roman Empire.1 Two aspects in particular have attracted special comment

In: The Statesman in Plutarch's Works, Volume I: Plutarch's Statesman and his Aftermath: Political, Philosophical, and Literary Aspects
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CHAPTER TWO STATESMANSHIP AND RETALIATION: BETWEEN CAPUA AND PRAENESTE Italy, of course, could not be treated as a Roman province: it was the centre of the empire. It is true that a considerable part of it had revolted against Rome and her hegemony, but after the enfranchisement of the Allies it

In: Sulla, the Elites and the Empire