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Author: Ellen Huijgh

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/187119111X557409 The Hague Journal of Diplomacy 6 (2011) 219-227 brill.nl/hjd Book Reviews R.S. Zaharna, Battles to Bridges: US Strategic Communication and Public Diplo- macy after 9/11 , ISBN: 0-230-20216-0, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author: James Pamment

publics are met. This suggests that any paradigm shift from old to new public diplomacy has in practice centred on domes- tic and organizational concerns rather than the achievement of normative goals such as increased dialogue with foreign citizens. Keywords public diplomacy, strategic communication

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author: Evan H. Potter

combination of Kremlin-financed official broadcasters, strategic communication by the Russian Embassy through media relations and social media messaging, and unofficial online blogs and alternative news sites that are sympathetic to Russia’s world view — sought to gain access to Canadian mainstream media to

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

quickly enough is often a difficult skill for bureaucracies to master. The second dimension is strategic communication, which develops a set of simple themes, much as a political or advertising campaign does. The campaign plans symbolic events and communications over the course of the next year or so to

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

motivated and unmotivated psychological biases that lead disinformation to be so successful, we at the same time have a better understanding of how to employ strategic communication and technology to counter it. In many cases, existing public diplomacy campaigns and efforts already include many of these

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

have a better understanding of how to employ strategic communication and technology to counter it. In many cases, existing public diplomacy campaigns and efforts already include many of these suggested strategies and elements. However, additional strategic thinking is required on how to leverage and

In: Debating Public Diplomacy

bureaucracies to master. The second dimension is strategic communication, which develops a set of simple themes, much as a political or advertising campaign does. The campaign plans symbolic events and communications over the course of the next year or so to reinforce central themes or to advance a particular

In: Debating Public Diplomacy
In: The Future of U.S. Public Diplomacy
Author: Bruce Gregory

Understanding, planning, engagement and advocacy are core concepts of public diplomacy. They are not unique to the American experience. There is, however, an American public diplomacy modus operandi with enduring characteristics that are rooted in the nation’s history and political culture. These include episodic resolve correlated with war and surges of zeal, systemic trade-offs in American politics, competitive practitioner communities and powerful civil society actors, and late adoption of communication technologies. This article examines these concepts and characteristics in the context of US President Barack Obama’s strategy of global public engagement. It argues that as US public diplomacy becomes a multi-stakeholder instrument and central to diplomatic practice, its institutions, methods and priorities require transformation rather than adaptation. The article explores three illustrative issues: a culture of understanding; social media; and multiple diplomatic actors. It concludes that the characteristics shaping the US public diplomacy continue to place significant constraints on its capacity for transformational change.

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Finalist of the 2016 National Indie Excellence Book Awards in the Social/Political Change Category! This award honors outstanding books from smaller or independent publishers that deserve recognition "for going the extra mile to produce books of excellence in every aspect." The book was originally published by Rodopi and acquired by Brill in January 2014.

To what extent should animal rights activists promote animal rights when attempting to persuade meat-lovers to stop eating animals? Contributing to a classic social movement framing debate, Freeman examines the animal rights movement’s struggles over whether to construct farming campaign messages based more on utility (emphasizing animal welfare, reform and reduction, and human self-interest) or ideology (emphasizing animal rights and abolition). Freeman prioritizes the latter, “ideological authenticity,” to promote a needed transformation in worldviews and human animal identity, not just behaviors. This would mean framing “go veg” messages not only around compassion, but also around principles of ecology, liberty, and justice, convincing people “it’s not fair to farm anyone”. Through a unique frame analysis of vegan campaign materials (from websites, to videos, to bumper stickers) at five prominent U.S. animal rights organizations, and interviews with their leaders, including Ingrid Newkirk and Gene Baur, Freeman answers questions, such as: How is the movement defining core problems and solutions regarding animal farming and fishing? To which values are activists appealing? Why have movement leaders made these visual and rhetorical strategic choices – such as deciding between appealing to human self-interest, environmentalism, or altruism? To what extent is the animal rights movement actually challenging speciesist discrimination and the human/animal dualism? Appealing to both scholars and activists, Framing Farming distinctively offers practical strategic guidance while remaining grounded in animal ethics and communication theory. It not only describes what 21st century animal rights campaigns are communicating, it also prescribes recommendations for what they should communicate to remain culturally resonant while promoting needed long-term social transformation away from using animals as resources.