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Kristine Krause and Katharina Schramm

Abstract

In the introduction to this special volume the editors focus on the analytical value of “political subjectivities” in emergent social fields that are characterized by multiple diasporic overlaps. They emphasize the central role played by various forms of governance in producing, confirming and contesting politics of transnational incorporation and diasporic participation and consider how these political projects often target members of historically differently situated groups. In particular, they draw attention to moments of exclusion and non-incorporation. The analytical concept of political subjectivity helps to understand how people relate to governance and authorities. It denotes how a single person or a group of actors is brought into a position to stake claims, to have a voice, and to be recognizable by authorities. At the same time the term points to the political and power-ridden dimension within politics of identity and belonging, encompassing the imaginary as well as the judicial-political dimension of claims to belonging and citizenship.

Across the Borders of Political Subjectivity

Ghanaian Migrants to Italy as Development Brokers

Selenia Marabello

Abstract

Based on the ethnography of two co-development projects run by Ghanaian migrants to Italy, this article explores migrants’ political subjectivity by examining practices and discourses on migration as a resource for development. In Ghana, which is considered one of the African states more pro-active in designing policies to channel migration for development, diasporic groups have been re-articulated as part of the transnational nation. In Italy, where migrants are incorporated as subaltern subjects, migration and development policies have been interpreted as an inclusive tool for promoting socio-economic integration in the country of immigration. In this scenario, where neo-liberal policies celebrate migrants’ potential as development agents, the analysis focuses on the way Ghanaian migrants imagine and encounter the state of both origin and destination while reflecting and embodying discourses, becoming development brokers, and struggling to be recognized across borders.

Francesco Mazzucotelli

’ailleurs privilégié les facteurs et processus de transformation sociale. La plupart des travaux de recherche se focalisent donc sur l’usage des réseaux sociaux et les nouveaux canaux d’expression, la création de nouvelles subjectivités politiques (Challand, 2011 ), les dissymétries sociales et les configurations de