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5.1 Maximum Permissible Breadth International consensus, as reflected in article 3 of the LOS Convention, provides that: Every State has the right to establish the breadth of its territorial sea up to a limit not exceeding 12 nautical miles, measured from baselines determined in

In: Excessive Maritime Claims

IV. Territorial Sea «Etenim mare cum liberum aut clausum dicitur, indefinite nee satis plene dicitur, quia Mare id Liberum tantum intelligitur, quod in proprietatem occupantis venire nequit; sicuti clausum, quod jam occupatum claudi ac subjici dominio inque proprietatem venire potest

In: Lines in the Sea
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Introduction Japan’s composition as a state of more than 6,800 islands with a sizable internal water, and its proximity to other states in East Asia, have produced an unique approach to its territorial sea. The approach reflected Japan’s national interests, both as a coastal state of a

In: Japanese Maritime Security and Law of the Sea
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Introduction Public information about state practice in response to foreign submarines intruding in territorial seas or internal waters is rather limited. However, there is no doubt that such violations take place in the waters of many countries. As regards the Nordic States, several cases of

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

Chapter Five Territorial Sea 5.1 Maximum Permissible Breadth International consensus, as reflected in article 3 of the LOS Convention, pro- vides that: Every State has the right to establish the breadth of its territorial sea up to a limit not exceeding 12 nautical miles, measured from baselines

In: Excessive Maritime Claims

THE GREEK TERRITORIAL SEA by Krateros M. Ioannou Professor of Public International Law, Demokritus University of Thrace Center of International and European Law P.O. Box 14 Kalamaria 55 I 02 Greece Tel.: 3 I-473-403 Fax : 31-434- 100 THE GREEK TERRITORIAL SEA Krateros M. Ioannou 1. INTRODUCTION

In: Greece and the Law of the Sea
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10.1 Right of Innocent Passage One of the fundamental tenets in the international law of the sea is that all ships of all States enjoy the right of innocent passage through the territorial sea of other States. 1 The LOS Convention provides definitions for the meaning of “passage

In: Excessive Maritime Claims
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Chapter Five Territorial Sea 5.1. Introduction The territorial sea is, with the internal waters and the high seas, one of the oldest maritime zones.1 As indicated in a previous chapter, there was no doubt during the 19th century, both in international law and in domestic law, that the United

In: South Africa and the Law of the Sea
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This book examines UN naval peace operations, addressing the construction and assessment of authority with respect to a range of acts essential to the conduct of such operations. The focus is particularly upon operations as they relate to and impact upon the Territorial Sea. Within a conceptual approach emphasising the interaction of power and legitimation in the construction of authority, naval peace operations issues such as Innocent Passage, interdiction operations, and transitional administration are considered. The book concludes by proposing a conceptually and operationally sensitive approach to constructing authority for the conduct of UN naval peace operations in the Territorial Sea.

-escalating a coastal State’s maritime law enforcement action against foreign-flagged State vessels—namely warships and other government ships on non-commercial service—navigating in its territorial sea in order to protect its territorial waters as a peaceful maritime engagement without using prohibited armed

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In: Peaceful Maritime Engagement in East Asia and the Pacific Region