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Since the early 1990s, when Kelman’s unofficial 3 dialogue helped foster the Oslo Accords ( 1997 ), Track ii diplomacy 4 has proliferated around the world (Montville 2006 : 15–16; Kaye 2007 : 1–2; Babbitt 2009 : 544–546; Greig & Diehl 2012 : 63; Hellman 2012 : 591; Themnér & Wallensteen

In: International Negotiation

-traditional actors. This has been described as track- ii diplomacy. This is where citizen peace-building associations develop into what we call a ‘peace-building organism’, which engages private citizens, the media, local and national political leaders, religious leaders and other influential target groups. In the

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
The Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in the Early Cold War
From 1957 onwards, the "Pugwash Conferences" brought together elite scientists from across ideological and political divides to work towards disarmament. Through a series of national case studies - Austria, China, Czechoslovakia, East and West Germany, the US and USSR – this volume offers a critical reassessment of the development and work of “Pugwash” nationally, internationally, and as a transnational forum for Track II diplomacy. This major new collection reveals the difficulties that Pugwash scientists encountered as they sought to reach across the blocs, create a channel for East-West dialogue and realize the project’s founding aim of influencing state actors. Uniquely, the book affords a sense of the contingent and contested process by which the network-like organization took shape around the conferences.

Contributors are Gordon Barrett, Matthew Evangelista, Silke Fengler, Alison Kraft, Fabian Lüscher, Doubravka Olšáková, Geoffrey Roberts, Paul Rubinson, and Carola Sachse.
Author: Vasu Gounden

international dynamics on the mediation, the importance and challenges of addressing the root causes of the conflict in a mediation process, and finally the role of non-state actors and Track ii diplomacy. These case studies were identified and investigated in-depth for a number of reasons. First, these

In: International Negotiation

is track-II diplomacy involves an asymmetrical relationship between a state and an often nebulous and evasive group. Its management is most paradoxical, for the negotiation is a non-negotiation and the counterparts are the most unlikely of negotiators. Th is article analyses the very specific elements

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author: Denise Garcia

the mediation, the impact of regional and international dynamics on the mediation, the importance and challenges of addressing the root causes of the conflict in the mediation process, and the role of non-state actors and Track ii diplomacy. Nimet Beriker examines international mediation in the

In: International Negotiation
Author: Shlomo Brom

GOI and the PLO that brought about a historical agreement between the two parties. It is a classic example of “track IIdiplomacy, and provides a good case to be studied in history, political science, and diplomacy. When it is examined, there is still a need to deal with the debate that has

In: Bustan: The Middle East Book Review

Chataway “In Practice: Track II Diplomacy: From a Track I Perspective.” Negotiation Journal 14, 3 (1998). See also Ronald Fisher and Loraleigh Keashly. “The Potential Complementarity of Mediation and Consultation Within a Contingency Model of INER 11,1_f2_1-6I 5/30/06 2:28 PM Page 5 6 SUSAN ALLEN NAN

In: International Negotiation

deepen understanding of non-state actor involvement in public diplomacy and track ii diplomacy. This is because an ‘other diplomacies’ framework permits the identification of the diplomatic practices of non-state actors that can make them useful to state-led diplomatic initiatives, even if at other

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy