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REFERENCES A.O.A.C. 1965. Olive oil acidity. In: Methods of analysis of the Association of Official Agriculture Chemists. 9th ed. In: Horwitz, W., ed. Washington, DC, p. 431. Angerosa, F. 2002. Influence of volatile compounds on virgin olive oil quality evaluated by analytical

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Cabrera, E.R., Arriaza, M. and Rodríguez-Entrana, M., 2015. Is the extra virgin olive oil market facing a process of differentiation? A hedonic approach to disentangle the effect of quality attributes. Grasas Aceites 66: 7-8. Is the extra virgin olive

In: Green metamorphoses: agriculture, food, ecology

olive oil: the importance of origin cues. Food Quality and Preference 22: 757-762. How consumers choose olive oil: the importance of origin cues Food Quality and Preference 22 757 762 Delgado, C. and J. Guinard. 2011. How do consumer hedonic ratings for extra virgin olive oil relate to quality

Open Access
In: International Food and Agribusiness Management Review

Studies about how to convey a message through a communication campaign abound, but another important aspect is what to communicate, in other words, selecting the information content of the campaign. In many situations where the degree of knowledge is directly related to consumption of a food product, choosing what to communicate is crucial. The present study proposes a model to decide what the consumer needs to know in order to take the decision to consume. The model is based on a Qualitative Comparative Analysis method with some subsequent conversions. It was applied to a real situation: selecting the information content of a communication campaign to boost the consumption of virgin olive oils in the Spanish market. The main findings suggest that campaigns should inform about virgin olive oils are the highest quality and most healthy, that there is a basic difference between olive oil and virgin olive oil in that olive oil is a mixture of virgin and refined olive oils, and that they are both equally fattening.

Open Access
In: International Food and Agribusiness Management Review

Abstract

Small farms have the option of competing in the global market by pursuing a niche brand differentiation strategy. However, they usually face tight financial constraints when attempting to build a food brand that meets both the desires of a small segment of distant final consumers and the requirements of its international buyers. In this study, we explore how small farms can use social networks to start transacting with international buyers and to build global niche brands. Following a ‘grounded theory’ approach, we analyzed the evidence collected from 34 cases of small farms producing single-estate extra-virgin olive oil and other specialty food products in Italy. The analysis led to the following conclusions. First, small olive oil farmers can build brand associations and perceived brand quality, and ultimately brand equity, by developing social ties with third-party endorsers that are outside the product supply chain but have high status in the market. Second, to intentionally develop these social ties, small olive oil farmers need to obtain information both on (a) international consumer preferences for olive oil attributes and (b) which actors have the high status to endorse and promote the individual brands. Third, use of social ties with high-status endorsers for brand development is more effective when international consumers’ familiarity with the product is lower and their preference for credence attributes stronger. While concerning a developed country that moreover enjoys a strong reputation in relation to the product, we posit that this study is rich with lessons for small producers of specialty food in both developed and developing regions whose reputations associated with the specific products are high. From a policy perspective, this study suggests that public market development programs can play a key facilitation role for the development of social networks linking small companies and international buyers by providing relevant market information on third-party endorsers as well as final consumers and buyers.

Open Access
In: Journal on Chain and Network Science

virgin olive oil extracted from varieties Picual and Hojiblanca and on the different components involved. J. Agric. Food Chem. 47: 121-127. International Olive Council. 1984. Document 6—International Olive Council, Madrid, Spain. Kouraba, K., Gil Ribs, J., Blanco Roldan, G.L., de Jaime

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences
Authors: and

as well. The increased awareness worldwide of the benefits of olive oil has made “Virgin Olive Oil” the common standard, while consumers are more and more likely to ask for the highest quality “Extra Virgin Olive Oil”. Innovation and modernization have become essential for increased production, and

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Accorsi, R., Versari, L. and Manzini R., 2015. Glass vs. plastic: life cycle assessment of extra-virgin olive oil bottles across global supply chains. Sustainability 7: 2818

In: Green metamorphoses: agriculture, food, ecology

, F., Balzano, D. and Ritieni, A., 2007. Simultaneous determination of aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A and their natural occurrence in Mediterranean virgin olive oil. Food Additives and Contaminants 24: 173-180. Simultaneous determination of aflatoxin B1 and

In: World Mycotoxin Journal

oil. According to the European Union Regulation EC 1019/2002, the categories of olive oil are “extra virgin olive oil” (highest quality), “virgin olive oil,” “olive oil,” and “olive pomace oil.” (Diario Oficial de las Comunidades Europeas, 2002). Regarding Spain, based on the information reported

Open Access
In: International Food and Agribusiness Management Review