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1. Introduction This article examines the process by which proceedings are conducted in war crimes tribunals with a view to making the case for a universally applicable framework, which is to serve as a template for the formation and evaluation of procedural rules for war crimes tribunals

In: International Community Law Review

Peace, Terrorism, Armed Conflict and War Crimes Today, it sounds rather strange to associate terrorism with peace. Against the backdrop of Islamic State ( is ) fighters slaughtering civilians in Syria and Iraq, it is hard to see how terrorism could be connected to a situation of peace. In the

In: Security and Human Rights

1. Introduction The War Crimes Chamber of the State Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina (WCC) was established in 2005 in the context of the development of war crimes prosecutions at global level. As the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal

In: International Criminal Law Review
Author: Joris van Wijk

There obviously is a reason why many wars in the past have ended in political settlements, including limited or general amnesties for perpetrators of war crimes. The option to grant amnesty can play a critical role in bringing the different parties of the conflict to the negotiating table. Most

In: International Criminal Law Review
Author: Matthew Garrod

law. This development is widely asserted to have given rise to universal jurisdiction over crimes under international law, including war crimes and crimes against humanity, for the prosecution of perpetrators of gross human rights offences. 1 This makes universality a relatively new development in

In: International Criminal Law Review
Author: Leslie C. Green

Group rights, war crimes and crimes against humanity LESLIE C. GREEN University Professor Emeritus, Honorary Professor of Law University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Received 19 March 1993; accepted on arrival. Abstract. This article gives an overview of the doctrine, state practice

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

1 Introduction The dissolution of former Yugoslavia in the early 1990s and horrendous events that followed revived memories of World War Two on European soil and unfortunately necessitated later prosecutions of war crimes at both the international level and domestically before the local courts. In

In: International Criminal Law Review

groups with an interest in preventing accountability for those crimes have disrupted attempts to fully democratise Serbia and stabilise its political scene. Impunity for war crimes in Serbia is by no means over. 2 Indeed, nearly two decades after the beginning of the disintegration of Yugoslavia and

In: International Criminal Law Review
Authors: Dan Plesch and Shanti Sattler

international war crimes commission established by these same states in October 1943 under the name “The United Nations Commission for the Investigation of War Crimes” that soon became the “United Nations War Crimes Commission” (UNWCC). 4 The extensive work of the UNWCC and these tribunals serve as a source of

In: International Community Law Review
Author: Henri Decœur

laws of war. 5 As a result, some conducts remain prohibited in international conflicts only, as evidenced by the legislation of numerous States. 6 The characterisation of the conflict—i.e. the definition of the contextual element of war crimes—is thus a determining step that impacts on the criminal

In: International Criminal Law Review