Between Dishwater and the River

Toward an Ecowomanist Methodology

Sofía Betancourt

argue that their differences are falsely inflated by the long-standing myth that communities of color have no interest in environmental issues. I utilize a womanist methodology drawn from the foundational work of Katie G. Cannon that engages literary and musical sources to propose an ecowomanist

Yolanda Pierce

Who Will Tell These Stories? When writer Alice Walker coined the term womanist she gave a name to a construct adopted by black women theologians and scholars of religion as they sought to recover and critique theological conversations that excluded the voices and experiences of women of

Paul Tewkesbury

’s womanist philosophy as revealed in Meridian is more congruent with King’s Christian theology than one might expect. The similarities between Walker’s and King’s thought may not be immediately apparent because of generational, socioeconomic, and ideological differences between the two figures. King was

Theology and Race

Black and Womanist Traditions in the United States

Andrew Prevot

theology and womanist theology in their origins, developments, and internal differentiations. These traditions suggest a better path forward for Christianity and for this modern racialized world. Yet they are not always well understood. It is not uncommon to find them mentioned only quickly in passing and

Theology and Race

Black and Womanist Traditions in the United States

Series:

Andrew Prevot

theology and womanist theology in their origins, developments, and internal differentiations. These traditions suggest a better path forward for Christianity and for this modern racialized world. Yet they are not always well understood. It is not uncommon to find them mentioned only quickly in passing and

Frank D. Macchia

pneumatological point of departure advocated by these essays for addressing feminist/womanist concerns from within the contexts of pentecostal communities of faith. This pneumatological point of departure will attend, from the start, to the diversely gifted social base of theological reflection, namely, the

Sofía Betancourt

Abstract

The ground of ecowomanist ethics is watered by multigenerational responses to racial and gender stereotypes in relation to communal knowledge of the land. This wisdom survived through centuries of violence and the daily lived experience of bigotry and abuse in a white supremacist world, and rests on pluralistic understandings of the sacred relationship between human and non-human nature. It remains today as part of the womanist call to accountability and spirit defined in Alice Walker’s writings. Emergent ecowomanist thought is uniquely situated to interrupt many of the stereotypes that serve to maintain a separation between black communities and environmental engagement. This article argues that a robust ecowomanist ethics should situate itself in the interplay between ecojustice and environmental justice approaches to environmental devastation. It draws on the poem “No Images,” written by William Waring Cuney at the beginning of the Harlem Renaissance period, centering on the lived experiences of black women as expressed through black women’s musical appropriations of his work. The clear lamentation and grief interwoven between the words of this short poem are given new life in the voices of Nina Simone and Ysaye Maria Barnwell with the women of Sweet Honey in the Rock. Engaging questions of environmental ethics through the lens of black women’s lived experiences of agency and struggle can create a theological foundation for ecowomanist thought that promotes the preservation of both nature and human dignity.

Antipas L. Harris

Diana L. Hayes, No Crystal Stair: Womanist Spirituality (Maryknoll, NY : Obis Press, 2016). vii + 140 pp. $ 23.00 paperback. No Crystal Stair: Womanist Spirituality draws upon Diana Hayes’ twenty-five years of reflections on spirituality. The collection of essays, prayers, and meditations draft

Ron Serino

Womanist Interpretations of the Bible: Expanding the Discourse . Semeia Studies 85. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature Press, 2016. Pp. 358. Pbk. $49.95. isbn : 978-0884141853. Gay Byron and Vanessa Lovelace, in the tradition of pioneering volumes edited by Letty Russell, Cain Hope Felder

Women in Pentecostal and Charismatic Ministry

Informing a Dialogue on Gender, Church, and Ministry

Series:

Edited by Margaret English de Alminana and Lois E. Olena

Women in Pentecostal and Charismatic Ministry: Informing a Dialogue on Gender, Church, and Ministry, co-edited by Margaret English de Alminana and Lois E. Olena, concerns women and Pentecostalism. It introduces the way the Pentecostal/charismatic movement has been shaped by and has shaped women from its beginning and offers a wide variety of responses to the opportunities and limitations women have experienced in their commitment to religious service. Scholars, activists, leaders, and exemplars from a variety of disciplines reflect on the question: How have women responded to a religious context that has depended upon their gifts while, at the same time, limited their voices and perspectives? This volume offers missing and/or silent voices an important corrective and a way forward to shape gender-focused discussions.

Contributors are: Estrelda Yvonne Alexander, Peter Althouse, Linda M. Ambrose, Melissa L. Archer, Amy C. Artman, Denise A. Austin, Kate Bowler, Barbara Cavaness-Parks, Loralie Robinson Crabtree, Naomi Dowdy, Margaret English de Alminana, Beth (A. Elizabeth) Grant, Jacqueline Grey, Mimi R. Haddad, Jennifer A. Miskov, Stephanie L. Nance, Lois E. Olena, Ava Kate Oleson, Joy E. A. Qualls, and Zachary Michael Tackett.