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Edited by Akinyinka Akinyoade, Wijnand Klaver, Sebastiaan Soeters and Dick Foeken

This volume attempts to dig deeper into what is currently happening in Africa’s agricultural and rural sector and to convince policymakers and others that it is important to look at the current African rural dynamics in ways that connect metropolitan demands for food with value chain improvements and agro-food cluster innovations. It is essential to go beyond a ‘development bureaucracy’ and a state-based approach to rural transformation, such as the one that often dominates policy debate in African government circles, organizations like the African Union and the UN, and donor agencies.

Adams Bodomo and Enyu Ma

many factors that help shape community formation, but in this paper we focus on the role of food and food-making places in this process of community formation in the context of the African Diaspora in China. We focus on two settlements, Guangzhou in Guangdong province and Yiwu in Zhejiang province, two

Secondary Sources Subject Searches: Food handling--Law and legislation--South Africa.Food supply--Law and legislation--South Africa. Primary Sources Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, No. 54, 1972. Gazette. This is a major framework act. It calls for inspection, regulates advertising

Debevec, Liza

This entry examines food related practices as they pertain to women, gender, and Islamic cultures in Sub-Saharan Africa through examples from countries such as Niger, Sudan, Ethiopia, Mali, and Burkina Faso. Attention is given to the ways in which the lives of Muslim women and men in Sub

http://aec.msu.edu/fs2/test/index.cfm Hosted by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa’s Sustainable Development Division, in cooperation with African food security and policy networks and Michigan State University’s Department of Agricultural Economics, this is the demo version

Shaheed Tayob

halal consumption in South Africa. It reflected the development of a halal consciousness that extended beyond the realm of only meat products and into the unseen, intangible, expert-controlled world of food technology. These fairly recent and humble beginnings of nonmeat halal certification stand in

Ann Allen

The chapter considers food and eating customs within the culture of the Yorùbá, both resident in West Africa and scattered abroad. It looks specifically at the shared values and customs and how these define what is eaten, how it is eaten, and how the rules, organisation and values create a gastronomic and cultural identity. Both familial organisation and religion are central sources of personal and cultural identity for Yorùbá. The Yorùbá share their cuisine with their divinities (orisas), thus reminding themselves of the presence of orisas in their daily life. Women have traditionally worked outside of the home and have been solely responsible for food preparation and cooking whose preservation has, until recently, relied on familial oral tradition. Traditional fireside tales perform a crucial social and cohesive function. Food preparation time is used to teach through telling tales that identify the adverse results of, for instance, rivalry within the group or the dangers in greed. Communal eating itself fosters familial closeness and mutual responsibility, engenders the rules and customs of eating, and is a place where the concepts of seniority and character are enacted for family members and played out by guests. The Yorùbá community in Auckland, New Zealand, demonstrates that many of the dining habits traditionally associated with this cuisine are retained while others are adapted to the new circumstances. What is unchanged though, wherever Yorùbá are found, is extreme hospitality, overproduction of food in case guests arrive, inclusion of the stranger, and respect for the elders. It remains the case that what defines food consumption for the Yorùbá is the cuisine, the cultural significance of the group, as well as the individual’s place within (and relationship to) the group, their religion and orisas.

Derek J. Watson

Evidence for the earliest food production, symbolic representation and open air .village communities. in sub-Sahelian West Africa is associated with the Kintampo Tradition ca 3600 bp-3200 bp. This signals a profound transition in socio-economic organisation and technology as available evidence indicates that indigenes of the savanna-forest/forested zone comprised mobile and widely dispersed bands of hunter-gatherers. The Kintampo was originally viewed as a product of migration from the Sahel, but more recently, a syncretic development engendered by the adoption of northern traits by indigenous Punpun Tradition hunter-gatherers has been postulated. Both models are re-considered in view of a series of excavations of rock shelters in central Ghana, including a further re-excavation of K6, which yielded material culture of both traditions. Results are supplemented by a review of previous research, analysis of archival material, consideration of the wider archaeological context of West Africa and enthoarchaeological studies. The model proposed here challenges previous hypotheses for the emergence of the Kintampo out of existing local hunter-gatherer populations.

Mayfield, Cockcroft and Branch

RELATIONSHIPS AMONG DIET, GROWTH RATE, AND FOOD AVAILABILITY FOR THE SOUTH AFRICAN ROCK LOBSTER, JASUS LALANDII (DECAPODA, PALINURIDEA) BY S. MAYFIELD 1,3 ) , G. M. BRANCH 1 ) and A. C. COCKCROFT 2 ) 1 ) Marine Biology Research Institute, Zoology Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag

Q.B.O. Anthonio

. For social scientists engaged in research in several areas of modern Chinese history, there will be considerable anticipation of the future publication of Wickberg's larger work on land tenure. Princeton University Princeton, U.S.A. AMY A. WILSON BOOK REVIEWS P. F. M. McLoughlin, (ed.), African Food