visual cues in the environment to orient and navigate to a nest site but little is known of whether visual ‘micro’ landmarks are important for birds to relocate their nest location after they have decided on a particular site. The use of small landmarks may be important when the exact entrance to the

In: Behaviour

, Victoria, Australia. Many of the birds at this site are banded as part of an ongoing monitoring program by the Sherbrooke Lyrebird Survey Group (Maisey et al., 2018). 2.3. Methods A Lyrebird nest with an egg inside was located on 7 July 2018. A Bushnell NatureView HD Essential Trail Camera (1280

In: Behaviour

predators or other drongos). Of these 37 nesting attempts, 16 attempts resulted in fledglings. To sample vocalisations at the nest we watched the nest from a naturally covered hide, such as a fern or tangle of vines, approx. 10–15 m away. If the bird was present on or near (<5 m) the nest, we recorded a 2

In: Behaviour
Author: Alexandra Hoyt

Abstract

Told from the point of view of Ali Hoyt, an American undergrad college student, living and studying in the Republic of Guinea, West Africa, Doni Doni Kononi Danala – Little by Little the Little Bird Builds its Nest is an ethnographic reflection on intercultural exchanges and friendships across Western and non-Western cultural differences, and the deep and impactful effects of the intercultural mirror: the pupil of the eye of cultural others. Before she embarked on the study abroad trip, Hoyt shaved her head with the reasoning that she would attract less unwanted attention. No makeup or beauty products were purchased on preparatory shopping trips. The version of herself that her homestay families met and got to know was not the version of herself that she typically presented in the West. She was exposed. All of her exterior guards had been removed. Join Hoyt as she reflects on her cross-cultural experience living in Guinea, and the friends she met there who turned into family. The intercultural mirror is at play throughout each twist and turn for this Westerner experiencing non-Western travel for the first time.

In: Intercultural Mirrors
Chapter 3 Doni Doni Kononi Danala – Little by Little the Little Bird Builds Its Nest
Author: Alexandra Hoyt

Abstract

Told from the point of view of Ali Hoyt, an American undergrad college student, living and studying in the Republic of Guinea, West Africa, Doni Doni Kononi Danala – Little by Little the Little Bird Builds its Nest is an ethnographic reflection on intercultural exchanges and friendships across Western and non-Western cultural differences, and the deep and impactful effects of the intercultural mirror: the pupil of the eye of cultural others. Before she embarked on the study abroad trip, Hoyt shaved her head with the reasoning that she would attract less unwanted attention. No makeup or beauty products were purchased on preparatory shopping trips. The version of herself that her homestay families met and got to know was not the version of herself that she typically presented in the West. She was exposed. All of her exterior guards had been removed. Join Hoyt as she reflects on her cross-cultural experience living in Guinea, and the friends she met there who turned into family. The intercultural mirror is at play throughout each twist and turn for this Westerner experiencing non-Western travel for the first time.

In: Intercultural Mirrors