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Robert Schuman’s Commitment to European Unification

The Inspiring Role of his Roman Catholic Faith

Margriet Krijtenburg

the person and thoughts of the “Father of Europe” and principal architect of European unification, Robert Schuman, will be enlightening. 1 Robert Schuman was Minister of Foreign Affairs of France at the time he launched the Schuman Declaration, the kick-off of the European integration project. This

Robert Schuman’s Commitment to European Unification

The Inspiring Role of His Roman Catholic Faith

Margriet Krijtenburg

person and thoughts of the ‘Father of Europe’ and principal architect of European unification, Robert Schuman, will be enlightening. Robert Schuman was Minister of Foreign Affairs of France at the time he launched the Schuman Declaration, the kick-off of the European integration project. This led to the

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Janneke Weijermars

The United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815-1830) was a creation of the Congress of Vienna, where the map of Europe was redrawn following Napoleon’s defeat. Dutch language and literature were considered the essential tools to smoothly fuse the North and South – today, the Netherlands and Belgium respectively. King Willem I tried a variety of measures to stimulate and control literary life in the South, in an effort to encourage unity throughout his kingdom.

Janneke Weijermars describes the driving force of this policy and especially its impact in the South. For some authors, Northern Dutch literature represented the standard to which they aspired. For others, unification triggered a desire to assert their own cultural identity. The quarrels, mutual misunderstandings and subsequent polemics were closely intertwined with political issues of the day. Stepbrothers views the history of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands through a literary lens.

Christakis Georgiou

the radical populist right in Europe since the early 1980s. What has largely been missing from such debates, especially on the socialist left, is the evolving relationship and interaction of British capitalism with the process of European unification. In no other member state is there such a record of

Mónika Józon

intensified as the European academic projects on the unification of private law came into existence. Continental attention to mixed legal systems is evolving, whereas “mixed jurisdiction studies are still in their infancy”. 7 European developments followed a general revival of comparative law studies on

U. Sieber

86 U. Sieber1 European Unification and European Criminal Law2 1. INTRODUCTION 'The traditional common law will... inevitably be the starting point for every de- scription of the German criminal law. However, its character will more and more change into that of a mere historical prelude...' In

MERIE KUUS and KATALIN FÁBIÁN

MERIE KUUS (Vancouver, BC, Canada and K A T A L I N FABIAN and Easton, PA, USA) BLADES AMIDST THE VELVET?: DEVELOPMENT AND SECURITY IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE DURING EUROPEAN UNIFICATION I n t r o d u c t i o n The subject matter o f this inquiry - Central and Eastern E u r o p e - has been

Frank Unger

o r n : Unification, the Soviet Collapse, a n d the New Europe. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1999. xviii, 300 pp. $29.95. A n g e l a E. S t e n t ' s b o o k on t h e relations b e t w e e n M o s c o w , B o n n a n d E a s t Berlin since W o r l d W a r II is a delight a s well as

The Changing Political Structure of Europe

Aspects of International Law

Edited by René Lefeber, Malgosia Fitzmaurice and E.W. Vierdag

Following profound modifications of Soviet ideology after the coming to power of Gorbachev, Europe experienced an unprecedented time of change which resulted, inter alia, in the unification of the two German States, the abolition of socialist international organizations, the obsolescence of neutrality policies in the New Europe and the pull on the European Communities to admit new members. These revolutionary events give rise to interesting legal questions. Since international relations are changing, the legal framework in which these relations are set has to change, too. In December 1990, international legal aspects of the changes in the political structure of Europe were discussed at a conference held in Amsterdam. In this book, which takes account of the outcomes of the discussions, the international legal framework in which these changes take place and their consequences are described and analyzed by eminent scholars from East and West.

On Their Own Behalf

Ewald Ammende, Europe’s National Minorities and the Campaign for Cultural Autonomy 1920-1936

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Martyn Housden

What form should Europe take? Should it be based on ‘nation states’ or ‘states of nations’? On what basis should European unification proceed? Should it be an élite undertaking pioneered by statesmen elected to democratic government offices, or should true unification also demand a significant European cultural forum open to spokesmen and –women representing the continent’s nationality groups? Was the League of Nations really such a thing? Or was it a League of States? All these questions were posed by Ewald Ammende and his fellow minority associates during the 1920s. Coming to terms with the consequences of collapsed empires and at least four years of conflict, they were forced to consider how best to re-build their continent as if it were a tabula rasa. In the process, they provided intelligent, perceptive analyses of the national and international affairs of the day, particularly as they affected Central and Eastern Europe. Their voices, reflecting their status as national minorities and a geographical location beyond the borders of the post-war Great Powers, deserve to be written more thoroughly into the history of the interwar years. Their ideas still provide food for thought even today.