The Hungarian Reformation

Books from the National Széchényi Library, Hungary

Hungarian Reformation
Books from the National Széchényi Library, Hungary

The European Reformation affected societies from the Highlands in Scotland to the Carpathians in Transylvania. In recent years historians have begun to uncover the true breadth of religious reform across Europe during the early modern period. This has fundamentally changed our perception of the Reformation and of the development of Europe's major confessional communities.

Hungary
No part of Central Europe was more profoundly impacted by religious reform than the lands of the medieval Hungarian kingdom. On the front-line between Christian and Muslim Europe, Hungarian society was divided between a range of religions in the middle decades of the sixteenth century. In the Transylvanian principality these divisions were peacefully accommodated in a remarkable system of religious pluralism. The texts of Hungarian reformers, whether Lutheran, Calvinist, Catholic, or Anti-Trinitarian have hitherto been virtually unknown to the scholarly community. For the first time, this collection offers a comprehensive survey of the original writings of the Hungarian reformers. It includes texts from the period of the first stirrings of reform in the 1540s through to works written for the established churches of the region during the 1650s.

Religious diversity
The titles in this collection convey the unique character and wider significance of religious life in early modern Hungary. Texts have been chosen to reflect the religious diversity and spread of ideas about reform among the different linguistic communities of the region. There is firstly a focus on the emergence of three major strands of reform during the sixteenth century (Lutheran, Reformed, and Anti-Trinitarian), through works of doctrine, confessions, and catechisms. Further texts highlight battles over religious truth with particular regard to the sacraments and the Trinity. A third group of texts focus on the revival of Catholic piety in Hungary from the beginning of the seventeenth century. This collection also particularly concentrates on the development of Hungarian Reformed religion during the seventeenth century, one of the most significant but least well-understood of Europe's Calvinist churches, and includes literature about patterns of worship, educational reform, attitudes to politics and history, and about the Hungarian Puritan movement.

Wider significance
This collection is of immediate value not only to researchers of the history of Reformation in Central Europe, but also to those working on the impact across Europe of leading figures including Luther, Calvin, Bullinger, and Canisius. It is an invaluable resource for historians interested in the Lutheran Reformation, the development of international Calvinism, the Catholic Reformation, and the emergence of Anti-Trinitarianism. Finally, the collection features significant texts for historians of toleration, education, and patterns of religious piety.

Graeme Murdock

Women’s Industrial Labor in Hungary

An Overview of Main Tendencies and Turning Points from the End of the Nineteenth Century

Judit Acsády

labor in Hungary in a relatively wide time frame, from the last decades of the nineteenth century to the post-transitional years. The project relies on case studies from different fields over the century. The case studies about different industrial regions or characteristic industrial fields, or even

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Tamas Dezso Ziegler and Balázs Horváthy

1 Introduction Hungarian law reforms in the last two centuries have been accomplished through the adoption and reception of foreign legal models, 1 and therefore the general attitude of Hungarian law is characterized as both open and adaptive towards foreign legal models. Over the past two

Series:

Tamas Dezso Ziegler and Balázs Horváthy

1 Introduction Hungarian law reforms in the last two centuries have been accomplished through the adoption and reception of foreign legal models, 1 and therefore the general attitude of Hungarian law is characterized as both open and adaptive towards foreign legal models. Over the past two

The Origins of the Baptist Movement Among the Hungarians

A History of the Baptists in the Kingdom of Hungary From 1846 to 1893

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George Alex Kish

This study of the origins of the Baptist movement among the Hungarians examines the two attempts to establish a sustained Baptist mission in the Kingdom of Hungary during the nineteenth century: the first unsuccessful attempt begun in 1846 and the second attempt begun in 1873, which resulted in a sustained Baptist presence in Hungary. The primary question the study addresses is why the first attempt came to naught while the second attempt quickly flourished. Related to this is the question of whether any organic connection exists between the two Baptist mission endeavors. In answering these questions interesting themes concerning the intersection of Christian mission, socio-political concerns, and cultural-linguistic tensions are addressed.

Hungary's Long Nineteenth Century

Constitutional and Democratic Traditions in a European Perspective

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Laszlo Péter

Edited by Miklós Lojkó

László Péter, whose fourteen carefully selected essays are edited in this posthumous collection, was an indefatigable seeker of the most appropriate terminological modelling and narrative reconstruction of Hungary’s late nineteenth and early twentieth century progress from an essentially feudal entity into a modern European state. The articles examine thorny subjects, such as the growing tensions between the nationalities living within the multi-ethnic kingdom; language rights; autocracy, democracy and civil rights in Hungary perceived in a wider European context; the concept of the ‘Holy Crown’; the army question; church-state relations; the role of the intellectuals; and the changing British perception of Hungary. The central focus of the author’s microscope is reserved for a substantive re-evaluation of the Settlement between Hungary and the Austrian Empire in 1867, which had a decisive impact on the eventual fate of the old kingdom of Hungary and of the rest of Central Europe.

Balázs Schanda

I. A New Constitutional Framework A. Religious Rhetoric Hungary has been unique under post-communist countries for not adopting a new constitution after the collapse of the communist regime. The 1949 constitution was revised in 1989, with a preamble calling for a new constitution

Gábor Halmai

* Professor and Chair of Comparative Constitutional Law, European University Institute, Florence. 1 Introduction Before and after Hungary’s accession to the eu , the Hungarian Constitutional Court, a powerful and still independent institution, developed a consistent jurisprudence

Edwards

International Journal on Minority and Group Rights 5: 345-368, 1998. © 1998 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. 345 Hungarian National Minorities: Recent Developments and Perspectives GWYNETH E. EDWARDS Former lecturer in German/European Studies, Loughborough University

Athanasios Yupsanis

1 Introduction: The Cultural Autonomy Scheme Hungary was a pioneer in the post-Cold War era in establishing a minority rights regime, which accords a broad range of individual and collective rights to its minorities, including inter alia a right to cultural autonomy. 1 Generally, the term is