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Memories that Lie a Little

Jewish Experiences during the Argentine Dictatorship

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Emmanuel Kahan

At first glance, this book might appear to be yet another study on anti-Semitism in Argentina, supplementing those portraying this Southern Cone country as a Nazi shelter and perpetrator of anti-Jewish acts. Accounts of the last military dictatorship (1976-1983), which was responsible for the disappearance of thousands of people of Jewish origin, have contributed to this image. Memories that Lie a Little, however, challenges this view, shedding new light on Jewish experiences during the military dictatorship. Based on extensive archival research, it maps the positions of a wide range of Jewish organizations toward the military regime, opening the way for a better understanding of this complex historical period.



If, then, the dictatorship was not actually anti-Semitic in the strictest sense of the term, why is it remembered as such? Historical research is complemented here by a reconstruction of the ways in which the notion of the regime’s anti-Semitism was crafted from early on, and an examination of its uses, as well as the changes that this narrative underwent in the following years.
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Carlos Pereda

Lessons in Exile won the 2007 Siglo XXI International Essay Prize. The work is unique in its outlook on exile and offers remarkable insights into its subject. The book discusses with depth and exactness the phenomenon of exile from the combined perspectives of philosophy, morality, politics, literature, anthropology, and history. After an historical survey and the use of testimonies and literary materials, the book offers a comprehensive discussion of exile and subjectivity, as well as the many moral and political implications of this notion. It concludes by drawing many thought-provoking connections between exile and the way we assume our lives.
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Holy Organ or Unholy Idol?

The Sacred Heart in the Art, Religion, and Politics of New Spain

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Lauren G. Kilroy-Ewbank

Holy Organ or Unholy Idol? focuses on the significance of the cult of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and its accompanying imagery in eighteenth-century New Spain. Lauren G. Kilroy-Ewbank considers paintings, prints, devotional texts, and archival sources within the Mexican context alongside issues and debates occurring in Europe to situate the New Spanish cult within local and global developments. She examines the iconography of these religious images and frames them within broader socio-political and religious discourses related to the Eucharist, the sun, the Jesuits, scientific and anatomical ideas, and mysticism. Images of the Heart helped to champion the cult’s validity as it was attacked by religious reformers.
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The Atlantic World and the Manila Galleons

Circulation, Market, and Consumption of Asian Goods in the Spanish Empire, 1565–1650

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José Luis Gasch Tomás

In The Atlantic World and the Manila Galleons. Circulation, Market, and Consumption of Asian Goods in the Spanish Empire, 1565–1650, José L. Gasch-Tomás offers an account of the trade of Chinese silk and porcelain, and Japanese pieces of furniture, between colonial Spanish America and Asia across the Pacific Ocean, during the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The author also addresses the re-exportation of Asian goods from Spanish America to Iberia, the consumption of these goods in the Spanish Empire, and the conflicts derived from growing exchanges between the Americas and East Asia both in the international area and within the Spanish Empire. Making use of extensive historical sources, this book balances the predominant view on the history of the encounter between the Atlantic World and Asia during the early modern era, which on the Atlantic side stresses the importance of the Cape route, by using a framework that puts the Pacific Ocean and Spanish American elites in the centre of the explanation.
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The Antagonistic Principle

Marxism and Political Action

Massimo Modonesi

In this important contribution to political theory, Massimo Modonesi develops the thesis that a Marxist theory of political action can be developed from the notion of antagonism, defined as a distinctive feature of struggle and of the political experience of insubordination. The author argues this central idea with close reference to the concept of class struggle. He advances a theoretical proposal based on the triad subalternity-antagonism-autonomy, as well as the uneven and combined character of the processes of political subjectification. At the center of this triad, the concept of antagonism stands out as a logical principle and the core of a Marxist theory of political action. At the same time, subalternism reappears frequently, as the counter-pole of antagonistic activation and autonomous practices, and as the root of what Antonio Gramsci calls ‘passive revolutions’.
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Rubens Sawaya

Focusing on the processes of accumulation, concentration and centralisation of capital, this book explains the transnationalisation of capital and its impact on Latin America and Brazil. The first chapter addresses the logic of these processes from a Marxian perspective. The second chapter shows how this movement of capital expands into some Latin American countries, and how it subsequently retracts in the 1990s process of global centralisation. The third chapter evaluates Latin American strategies to attract capital by taking a subordinate position to capital’s global movement. The last two chapters focus on Brazil's development strategy in the face of the alternating expansion and contraction of capital, and point out the vulnerability of Latin American countries when their development is subordinate to transnational capital. First published in Portuguese as Subordinação consentida: capital multinacional no processo de acumulação da América Latina e Brasil by Annablume Editora/Fapesp in 2006.
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Splendor, Decline, and Rediscovery of Yiddish in Latin America presents Yiddish culture as it developed in an area seldom associated with the language. Yet several countries—Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico and Uruguay—became centers for Yiddish literature, journalism, political activism, theater, and music. Chapters by historians, linguists, and literary critics explore the flourishing of Yiddish there in the early 20th century, its retraction in the 1960’s, and contemporary endeavors to rescue this marginalized legacy.



Topics discussed in the volume include the literary figures of the “Jewish gaucho” and the peddler; the regional Yiddish press; the communal struggle against trafficking in women; cultural responses to the Holocaust; intra-Jewish conflict during the Cold War; debates on assimilation versus tradition; and emergent postvernacular Yiddish.
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Anthony D'Andrea

Reflexive Religion: The New Age in Brazil and Beyond examines the rise of alternative spiritualities of the self in contemporary Brazil. Masterfully combining late modern theories and multi-site ethnographies of the New Age, it explains how traditional religion is being transformed by processes of reflexivity, globalization and individualism. It unveils how the New Age has entered Brazil, was adapted to local Catholic, Spiritist and psychology cultures, and more recently, how the Brazilian Nova Era re-enters transnational circuits of spiritual practice. Reflexive Religion offers a compelling account of how the religious field is being updated under late modern conditions.
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Photographic Ekphrasis in Cuban-American Fiction

Missing Pictures and Imagining Loss and Nostalgia

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Louisa Söllner

Photographic Ekphrasis in Cuban-American Fiction offers new readings of Cuban-American novels and autobiographies, demonstrating that a focus on photographs (alluded to, analyzed, and/or obsessively recurrent in the narrative discourse) provides fresh insights into these texts. The study introduces the concept of photographic ekphrasis as a reading tool for diasporic literature and argues that visual images are important components of narratives about dislocation, nostalgia, and transcultural experience. Authors treated in depth include Carlos Eire, Cristina García, Oscar Hijuelos, Roberto G. Fernández, Ana Menéndez, Achy Obejas, and Gustavo Pérez Firmat. Missing Pictures offers an original perspective on Cuban-American literature and contributes to the scholarship on ekphrasis and on the interactions between photography and narrative.
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Milford Bateman, Dayrelis Ojeda Suris and Dean Sinković