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Patricia San José Rico

How do contemporary African American authors relate trauma, memory, and the recovery of the past with the processes of cultural and identity formation in African American communities?
Patricia San José analyses a variety of novels by authors like Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor and David Bradley, and explores these works as valuable instruments for the disclosure, giving voice and public recognition of African American collective and historical trauma.
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Edited by Paul L. Gareau, Spencer Culham Bullivant and Peter Beyer

Youth, Religion, and Identity in a Globalizing Context: International Perspectives investigates the ways that young people navigate the intersections of religion and identity. As part of the Youth in a Globalizing World series, this book provides a broad discussion on the various social, cultural, and political forces affecting youth and their identities from an international comparative perspective. Contributors to this volume situate the experiences of young people in Canada, the United States, Germany, and Australia within a globalized context. This volume explores the different experiences of youth, the impact of community and processes of recognition, and the reality of ambivalence as agency.
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U.S. Trotskyism 1928-1965. Part II: Endurance

The Coming American Revolution. Dissident Marxism in the United States: Volume 3

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Edited by Paul Le Blanc, Thomas Bias and Bryan D. Palmer

U.S. Trotskyism 1928-1965. Part II: Endurance: The Coming American Revolution is the second of a documentary trilogy on a revolutionary socialist split-off from the U.S. Communist Party, reflecting Leon Trotsky’s confrontation with Stalinism in the global Communist movement. Spanning 1941 to 1956, this volume surveys the Second World War (internationally and on the 'homefront'), the momentous post-war strike wave, ongoing efforts to comprehend and struggle against racism, as well as the early years of the Cold War and anti-Communist repression in the United States. Also covered are internal debates and splits among Trotskyists themselves, including a far-reaching split in the international Trotskyist movement (the Fourth International) in the face of a persistent and expanding Stalinism. Scholars and activists will find much of interest in these primary sources.
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Sean Durbin

In Righteous Gentiles: Religion, Identity, and Myth in John Hagee’s Christians United for Israel, Sean Durbin offers a critical analysis of America’s largest Pro-Israel organization, Christians United for Israel, along with its critics and collaborators. Although many observers focus Christian Zionism’s influence on American foreign policy, or whether or not Christian Zionism is ‘truly’ religious, Righteous Gentiles takes a different approach.

Through his creative and critical analysis of Christian Zionists’ rhetoric and mythmaking strategies, Durbin demonstrates how they represent their identities and political activities as authentically religious. At the same time, Durbin examines the role that Jews and the state of Israel have as vehicles or empty signifiers through which Christian Zionist truth claims are represented as manifestly real.
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Picturing America

Photography and the Sense of Place

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Edited by Kerstin Schmidt and Julia Isabel Faisst

Picturing America: Photography and the Sense of Place argues that photography is a prevalent practice of making American places. Its collected essays epitomize not only how pictures situate us in a specific place, but also how they create a sense of such mutable place-worlds. Understanding photographs as prime sites of knowledge production and advocates of socio-political transformations, a transnational set of scholars reveals how images enact both our perception and conception of American environments. They investigate the power photography yields in shaping our ideas of self, nation, and empire, of private and public space, through urban, landscape, wasteland and portrait photography. The volume radically reconfigures how pictures alter the development of American places in the past, present, and future.
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Edited by Harri Veivo, Petra James and Dorota Walczak-Delanois

Beat Literature in Europe offers twelve in-depth analyses of how European authors and intellectuals on both sides of the Iron Curtain read, translated and appropriated American Beat literature. The chapters combine textual analysis with discussions on the role Beat had in popular music, art, and different subcultures.
The book participates in the transnational turn that has gained in importance during the past years in literary studies, looking at transatlantic connections through the eyes of European authors, artists and intellectuals, and showing how Beat became a cluster of texts, images, and discussions with global scope. At the same time, it provides vivid examples of how national literary fields in Europe evolved during the cold war era.

Contributors are: Thomas Antonic, Franca Bellarsi, Frida Forsgren, Santiago Rodriguez Guerrero-Strachan, József Havasréti, Tiit Hennoste, Benedikt Hjartarson, Petra James, Nuno Neves, Maria Nikopoulou, Harri Veivo, Dorota Walczak-Delanois, Gregory Watson.
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Julia Faisst

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This essay investigates how climate change photographer and multimedia artist Mary Mattingly captures the dramatic impact humans exert on the environment during the Anthropocene. Its focus lies on her eco-critical “nomadographies,” in which she depicts a nomadic state of life in a hazardous environment. In her work, the supposedly “natural” risks that force people out of their homes on a global scale, and leave them homeless, have already run their course. As this essay demonstrates, the post-civilization ecosystems Mattingly creates and then interprets via photography perform practices of living in an increasingly toxic world. At the same time, her nomadographies are understood as an imaginary search for making these worn-out places habitable once more. To show the potential for migration in future conditions, Mattingly populates them with survivors. If homes can no longer be inhabited in one stationary place, her work suggests, they can likely be worn—hugged closer to one’s body.

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Miles Orvell

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This essay explores the way photography has been used in the late twentieth/twenty-first centuries as a documentary medium that shows us how our industrial and urban landscapes have changed and carries an implicit moral imperative as well. I focus on three photographers (Camilo José Vergara, Edward Burtynsky, and David T. Hanson) who represent three different approaches— historical, epic, and survey. The broader theoretical questions underlying the essay are two: Does specificity of place matter in the depiction of symbolic space? And—Can a photograph deny its own moral purpose and intention by virtue of its aesthetic power? Despite the ambiguities inherent in photography, I argue that the camera occupies a central place in contemporary culture by allowing us to answer key questions relevant to the problem of sustainable landscapes, questions about power and powerlessness.

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Katharina Fackler

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This chapter analyzes how the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s 1968 photobookThe Poor People’s Campaign : A Photographic Journal articulated a radical visual critique of the dominant socio-spatial order. It theorizes the protest photograph as a virtual stage for protesting bodies which can visually enact dissent and open up alternative spatialities. The chapter shows how the sclc used photography to stage the Poor People’s Campaign as a challenge to the geographic marginalization and material dispossession of poor people in the United States. By portrayingU.S. power as founded on racially motivated spatial and social injustice, it cautioned against the global Cold War ascendancy of democratic capitalism. Yet, as it imagined a heterotopic space in which poor people claim land and their right to the city, the sclc also struggled to accommodate the campaign’s multiplicity of gendered and racialized perspectives within its (photographic) frame of social and spatial justice.

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Kerstin Schmidt

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This essay looks at the ways in which the still powerful allure of documentary photography to serve as proof and authentic documentation has been called into question by the photographic practice of Stan Douglas and James Casebere. Douglas’s reconstructed settings in his seriesDisco Angola and Casebere’s miniature constructs of New England landscapes or his easily recognizable uncanny interiors of famous cultural places such as Monticello or Sing Sing penitentiary have intricately subverted documentary photography’s role in the representation of the places we live in. I will show how documentary photography’s evidentiary power has been undermined by the openly fictitious nature of Douglas’s and Casebere’s images, making us rethink the possibilities of the documentation, perception as well as representation of place in photography. Instead of allegedly photographing reality, these images of places evoke only shifting, evasive relations to the real, that is to the places of the world that we can only conceive of in fugitive images.