Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 56 items for :

  • Early Americas x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
The Uses of Archaeological Heritage in the Caribbean
What is the role of local Caribbean individuals and communities in creating and perpetuating archaeological heritage? How has archaeological knowledge been integrated into education plans in different countries? This book aims to fill a gap in both archaeological scholarship and popular knowledge by providing a platform for local Caribbean voices to speak about the archaeological heritage of their region. To achieve this, each chapter of the book focuses on identifying and developing strategies that academics, heritage practitioners, and non-scholars from the insular Caribbean can adopt to stimulate a necessary dialogue on how archaeological heritage is used and produced on various academic, political, and social levels.

Contributors are: Zara Ali, Arlene Álvarez, Lisette Roura Alvarez, Irvince Nanichi Auguiste, Victoria Borg O’Flaherty, Lornadale L. Charles, Eldris Con Aguilar, Raymundo A.C.F. Dijkhoff, Matthieu Ecrabet, Kevin Farmer, Cameron Gill, Eduardo Herrera Malatesta, Katarina Jacobson, Joseph Sony Jean, Debra Kay Palmer, Harold Kelly, Wilhelm Londoño Díaz, Stacey Mac Donald, Jerry Michel, Ashleigh John Morris, Andrea Richards, Kara M. Roopsingh, Pierre Sainte-Luce, Tibisay Sankatsing Nava, and Laurent Christian Ursulet.
New Voices in the History of Early Modern Education
Editor:
This volume offers a scholarly examination of educational history, highlighting the pivotal role of educational practices from the late medieval era to the early modern period. It provides a dynamic forum for emerging academics in the field, revealing fresh, multifaceted perspectives on the educational methods of this era. The work illuminates the sophisticated educational systems that shaped Renaissance Milan's merchants and the education of cantors in royal courts and cathedrals. Spanning from Brazil to India, it traces the extensive reach of Jesuit influence and reveals how their teachings fostered an early consciousness of a globally interconnected world in European education.

Contributors include Bradley Blankemeyer, Laura Madella, Jessica Ottelli, Federico Piseri, David Salomoni, and Carolina Vaz de Carvalho.
Although Jesuit contributions to European expansion in the early modern period have attracted considerable scholarly interest, the legacy of José de Acosta (1540–1600) is still defined by his contributions to natural history. The Theologian and the Empire presents a new biography of Acosta, focused on his participation in colonial and imperial politics. The most important Jesuit active in the Americas in the sixteenth century, Acosta was fundamentally a political operator. His actions on both sides of the Atlantic informed both Peruvian colonial life and the Jesuit order at the dawn of the seventeenth century.
Business News in the Early Modern Atlantic World explores the creation, dissemination, and consumption of a specific type of news, ‘business news’, within early modern commercial news networks. The volume contains eleven case studies, written by scholars from a range of disciplines, which span the breadth of the early modern Atlantic from the first appearance of serial corantos in the seventeenth century to the United States’ Declaration of Independence in the late eighteenth century.

These expert contributions showcase the range of innovative methodological and theoretical approaches which can be used to study business news, including social network analysis, textual analysis, and qualitative methods.
Historical Materialist Perspectives in Archaeology from America, Europe and the Near East in the 21st Century
Volume Editor:
This volume gathers papers written by archaeologists utilising the methods of historical materialism, attesting not only to what Marxism has contributed to archaeology, but also to what archaeology has contributed, and can contribute, to Marxism as a method for interpreting the history of humanity. The book’s contributors consider the question of what archaeology can contribute to a historical perspective on the overcoming of present-day capitalism, synthesising developments in world archaeology, and supplying concrete case studies of the archaeology of the Americas, Europe and the Near East.

Contributors are: Guillermo Acosta Ochoa, Marcus Bajema, Bernardo Gandulla, Alex Gonzales-Panta, Pablo Jaruf, Vicente Lull, Savas Michael-Matsas, Rafael Micó, Ianir Milevski, Patricia Pérez Martínez, Cristina Rihuete Herrada, Roberto Risch, Steve Roskams, Henry Tantaleán, Marcelo Vitores, and LouAnn Wurst.
This is the first thorough investigation of the Brummer brothers’ remarkable career as dealers in antiques, curiosities and modernism in Paris and New York over six decades (1906-1964). A dozen specialists aggregate their expertise to explore extant dealer records and museum archives, parse the wide-ranging Brummer stock, and assess how objects were sourced, marketed, labelled, restored, and displayed. The research provides insights into emerging collecting fields as they crystallised, at the crossroads between market and museum. It questions the trope of the tastemaker; the translocation of material culture, and the dealers’ prolific relationships with illustrious collectors, curators, scholars, artists, and fellow dealers.
The Plurality of Historical Worlds from Epicurus to Modern Science
Author:
By digging through the stratigraphy of the history of ideas we can find within and beyond Marxism an ‘aleatory current’ that values the role of chance in history. Using this perspective, the book builds a case for a historical materialism that is stripped of all teleology. Starting in the ancient Mediterranean with Epicurus, it traces the history of conceiving history as plural up to Marxism and modern science. It shows that concrete historical ‘worlds’ such as ancient Mesoamerica and Eurasia cannot be reduced to a single template. Affirming the potentiality of a future non-capitalist ‘world’, it invalidates any ‘end of history’ thesis.
Religion and Power in the Jesuit Missions of Spanish Amazonia
Established in 1638 in a vast Amazonian territory that today encompasses border areas of Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, and Brazil, the missions of Maynas were one of the Society of Jesus’s main enterprises in Spanish America. Jesuit writings provide a unique insight into the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century encounters between Europeans and indigenous peoples. In effect, they shed light on how native Amazonians appropriated elements of Christian religiosity and Iberian urban culture. This book is not only about how indigenous populations experienced life in missions. It is above all a study of how natives actively engaged with the practices and ideas of settlement and religiosity that the Jesuits transmitted.