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Elizabeth Agaiby

In The Arabic Life of Antony Attributed to Serapion of Thmuis, Elizabeth Agaiby demonstrates how the redacted Life of Antony, the “Father of all monks and star of the wilderness”, gained widespread acceptance within Egypt shortly after its composition in the 13th century and dominated Coptic liturgical texts on Antony for over 600 years – the influence of which is still felt up to the present day. By providing a first edition and translation, Agaiby demonstrates how the Arabic Life bears witness to the reinterpretation of the religious memory of Antony in the Coptic Orthodox Church.
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Vanessa Davies

One of the world's oldest treaties provides the backdrop for a new analysis of the Egyptian concept of hetep ("peace"). To understand the full range of meaning of hetep, Peace in Ancient Egypt explores battles against Egypt's enemies, royal offerings to deities, and rituals of communing with the dead. Vanessa Davies argues that hetep is the result of action that is just, true, and in accord with right order ( maat). Central to the concept of hetep are the issues of rhetoric and community. Beyond detailing the ancient Egyptian concept of hetep, it is hoped that this book will provide a useful framework that can be considered in relation to concepts of peace in other cultures.
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Irit Ziffer, Edwin C.M. van den Brink, Orit Segal and Uzi Ad

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Martha Sharp Joukowsky

Archaeological investigations of the Petra Great Temple by Brown University began in 1993 and continued until 2009 with the goals of documenting Nabataean culture as reflected in its architecture, artifact corpus, and subsistence patterns. Excavations have uncovered the largest architectural precinct in the legendary Nabataean capital. Ceramics, numismatics, lamps, and architectural iconography have provided benchmark dates for the first century B.C.–first century A.D. phases for the building of a distyle temple, remodeled into a grand tetrastyle edifice which is again refurbished in the later first or early second century A.D. with the insertion of a theater as its central focus. The chronological framework together with the excavations offers a view not only of the precinct itself, but also of the cultural interrelationships between Petra and other sites in Nabataea. Still unknown to many are the unique features of the Nabataean cultural canon.