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Akkadian Royal Letters in Later Mespotamian Tradition reconsiders the question of the authenticity of the letters attributed to earlier royal correspondents that were studied in Assyrian and Babylonian scribal centres ca. 700–100 BCE. By scrutinizing the letters’ contents, language, possible transmission histories ca. 1400–100 BCE and the epistemic limitations of authenticity criticism, the book grounds scepticism about the letters’ authenticity in previously undiscussed features of the texts. It also provides a new foundation for research into the related questions of when and why these beguiling texts were composed in the first place.
The Dynamics of Mediation in the Biblical World and Old Babylonian Mari
Author:
In Prophet, Intermediary, King: The Dynamics of Mediation in the Biblical World and Old Babylonian Mari, Julie B. Deluty investigates the mediation of prophecy for kings in biblical narratives and the Old Babylonian corpus from Mari. In many cases, the prophet’s message is delivered through a third party—sometimes a royal official or family member—who may exercise a degree of autonomy in the transmission of the words. Drawing on social network theory, the book highlights the importance of third-party intermediaries in the process of communication that lies at the core of biblical and ancient Near Eastern prophecy. Recognition of the place of non-prophetic intermediaries in a monarchic system offers a new dimension to the study of prophecy in antiquity.
The Israel Oriental Studies Annual Dedicated to the Ancient Near East, Semitics, and Arabic
The IOS Annual will present volumes that focus on either a variety of topics listed below or, alternatively, a volume focused on a specific topic or issue. Contributions in English and Arabic are accepted. The use of Arabic will promote the diffusion of western linguistic approaches in the Arabic Sprachraum and the translation into Arabic of specific terms from new linguistic disciplines. All chapters will include an abstract and keywords in Arabic, English and Hebrew.

The Ancient Near Eastern section will hold articles relating to the cultures and languages of the pre-Islamic Near East, in general, Cuneiform Studies (Assyriology and Hittitology) and Egyptology. Topics will include languages, religion, history, and culture. Articles will range from text editions and traditional philology to digital humanities and big-data in ancient corpora. The intended readers are scholars of the ancient Near East and related fields, such as Biblical Studies, the Classics, and Archaeology of Mesopotamia, the Levant and the Mediterranean.

The Semitic Linguistics section will publish papers on original, innovative research on all branches of the Semitic linguistic family, also considering their Afroasiatic background. The section will be open to different linguistic approaches: from the more traditional historical and comparative methods, to cognition, semantics, pragmatics, corpus linguistics, linguistic anthropology, psycholinguistics and discourse analysis. The openness to contemporary linguistic approaches will be a unique platform for the young generations of Semitists, attracting scholars of spoken/modern Semitic languages who must address platforms of general linguistics, often not suitable for specialists of Semitic and Afroasiatic languages, as they do not strictly follow traditional historical and philological models. The section holds special space for research on classical and modern varieties of Hebrew, treated from linguistic and philological perspectives. The intended readers are scholars and students of Semitic and Afroasiatic languages and cultures and scholars in all linguistic disciplines who want to access Semitic/Afroasiatic data.

The Arabic Language and Literature section will contain original articles on classical and contemporary Arabic linguistics and literature, with a particular stress on the medieval Arabic linguistic and literary traditions, their relations with other disciplines and cultures, and their modern offshoots. The intended readers are scholars and students of Arabic language and literature.
Editor:
Publishes ancient Babylonian letters from museums and collections throughout the world, with translations and scholarly commentary.
Strategies and Practices in Ancient Mesopotamia
Volume Editors: and
As magic is a powerful means to influence the natural world and human beings, and is deeply connected to the divine sphere, persons using it are in constant need to justify its use. The ambivalence of magic to serve both well-wishing and ill-wishing aims puts the practitioners ever at risk. This volume illuminates the strategies adopted to legitimise the practice of magic and analyses how these justifications are phrased and formulated in cuneiform texts, thereby revealing the underlying principles and unexplained axioms of using magic in the Ancient Near East.
Author:
In Nation and Empire as Two Trends of Political Organization in the Iron Age Levant MEI Hualong offers an analysis of national and imperial ideologies--two political principles that influenced the establishment, consolidation and expansion of trans-local/trans-tribal polities in the Iron Age Levant. By examining key terminologies, historical accounts and literary sources, MEI argues that the elites of ancient nations may attempt to reshape their political and cultural identity in imperial terms (vice versa, but to a lesser extent). The conceptual transformation from the one to the other is closely related to the political entity’s consciousness and understanding of limits and boundaries: political and cultural, real and imagined.
Volume Editors: and
The volume explores linguistic practices and choices in the late antique Eastern Mediterranean. It investigates how linguistic diversity and change influenced the social dimension of human interaction, affected group dynamics, the expression and negotiation of various communal identities, such as professional groups of mosaic-makers, stonecutters, or their supervisors in North Syria, bilingual monastic communities in Palestine, elusive producers of Coptic ritual texts in Egypt, or Jewish communities in Dura Europos and Palmyra. The key question is: what do we learn about social groups and human individuals by studying their multilingualism and language practices reflected in epigraphic and other written sources?