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The Near East has witnessed several of the world's earliest major civilizations and is the cradle of its three great monotheistic religions. These civilizations are part of the cultural heritage of large parts of world population today and their vestiges still impres man.
The Documenta et Monumenta Orientis Antiqui, founded in 1947 , are concerned with the sources for our knowledge of these civilizations, both written, art historical and monumental-important single documents or related groups of these, and archaeological sites.
Geographically the series covers the entire Near East, including Egypt and Iran, chronologically the entire period preceding the rise if Islam.
As far as the types of books included are concerned, the series publishes text editions, translations, reports of the excavations of important sites, monographs on substantial subjects, thematic collections of articles, and handbooks. The Volumes contribute to scholarly research. Their accessibility is enhanced by a proper organization of the contents and, wherever appropriate, by indexes. They include introductions placing the subjects in the context of pertinent developments of the time, and of current research.
Text editions are as a ruleaccompanied by a translation on facing pages; translations are fully annotated; the introductions to both text editions and translations include full evaluations of the text concerned.
The Volumes are in English, occasionally in German or French.
Papyrological Texts and Studies in Honour of Peter van Minnen
This is a Festschrift offered by friends and colleagues to papyrologist and ancient historian Peter van Minnen. The volume contains the edition or re-edition of 52 papyri and ostraca, dating from between the third century BCE and the eighth century CE. Their subjects vary from Demosthenes to the delivery of camels in early Islamic Egypt, and their provenances stretch from the Eastern to the Western Desert, and from the Egyptian Nile valley to Qasr Ibrim in northern Nubia. All texts are published with transcription, translation, commentary and colour photographs. In addition, there are five studies, reflecting the honorand’s wide-ranging interests.
An Early Qurʾānic Codex on Papyrus (P. Hamb. Arab. 68)
In the eighth century CE, the Christian theologian John Damascene referred to a Book of the Cow among the sacred texts of the Muslims. P. Hamb. Arab. 68 not only represents so far the earliest known Qurʾānic manuscript preserved on papyrus, but also bears witness to an independent circulation of the Sūra of The Cow in late seventh- or early eighth-century Egypt. Significant deviations from the commonly accepted text of the Qurʾān suggest that this copy was rapidly discarded. The present volume offers a complete edition as well as a thorough philological and historical study of the manuscript.
Papers from the Symposium at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, 18-19 October 2019
The Medinet Madi Library comes of age in this landmark volume as one of the 20th century’s major finds of religious manuscripts. Discovered in Egypt’s Fayum region in 1929, these Coptic codices contain a cross-section of the sacred literature of the Manichaean religion. Early work on the collection in the 1930s was cut short by the ravages of the second world war. Recent decades have brought multiple new editorial projects, on which this volume offers a comprehensive set of status reports, as well as individual studies on aspects of the Manichaean religion informed by the library’s contents.
Volume Editors: and
This volume contains the first edition of 66 papyri and ostraca in the collection of the Leiden Papyrological Institute. The texts are dated between the third century BCE and the eighth century CE and originate from Egypt. They include two Demotic literary papyri (one of which is written in Hieratic script), 19 Demotic ostraca, 44 Greek documentary papyri and one Coptic ostracon. All texts are published with transcription, translation, commentary and colour photographs.
Text and Context in Ancient Egypt. Studies in Honor of James P. Allen
In the House of Heqanakht: Text and Context in Ancient Egypt gathers Egyptological articles in honor of James P. Allen, Charles Edwin Wilbour Professor of Egyptology at Brown University. Professor Allen's contribution to our current understanding of the ancient Egyptian language, religion, society, and history is immeasurable and has earned him the respect of generations of scholars. In accordance with Professor Allen’s own academic prolificity, the present volume represents an assemblage of studies that range among different methodologies, objects of study, and time periods. The contributors specifically focus on the interconnectedness of text and context in ancient Egypt, exploring how a symbiosis of linguistics, philology, archaeology, and history can help us reconstruct a more accurate picture of ancient Egypt and its people.

The Figshare images in this volume have been made available online and can be accessed at https://figshare.com/s/8b3e5ad9f8a374885949
Volume Editors: and
Documentary texts are vital to our understanding of many aspects of the ancient world, such as its administration, education, and economy. The value of these texts goes even further however: being autographs, they directly testify to ancient communication practices, a field of study which so far has remained underexplored. In this volume, specialists in the field engage with a broad range of documentary sources. They discuss not only how various modes of communication, such as language, handwriting, and lay-out, are employed in specific contexts of writing, but also how these different modes are interrelated. Building on insights from contemporary social-semiotic theory, the volume makes a case for the establishment of historical social semiotics as a discipline.
Author:
At the center of this book stands a text-critical edition of three chapters of the Gāthās, exemplifying the editorial methodology developed by the “Multimedia Yasna” (MUYA) project and its application to the Old Avestan parts of the Yasna liturgy.
Proceeding from this edition, the book explores aspects of the transmission and ritual embedding of the text, and of its late antique exegetical reception in the Middle Persian (Pahlavi) tradition. Drawing also on a contemporary performance of the Yasna that was filmed by MUYA in Mumbai in 2017, the book aims to convey a sense of the Avestan language in its role as a central element of continuity around which the Zoroastrian tradition has evolved from its prehistoric roots up to the modern era.
The story of Tobit builds on various themes derived from myth, legend and folktale. Tobiah’s journey recalls Homer’s Odyssey, the suffering of the righteous brings to mind the legend of Job, and the narrative around a disgraced and then rehabilitated official evokes the story of Ahiqar. The author of Tobit seeks to exploit his readers’ knowledge of these stories in order to convey his message more effectively: he encourages them to trust in divine providence that intervenes on behalf of the faithful.
This volume, based on essays previously published in Italian, charts Tobit’s narrative sources through comparative literary analysis, firmly placing the story in the genre of the didactic and edifying religious novel.