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Military History and Ethnicity. Volume 1: The Twenty-Eight Yuntai Generals of the Eastern Han
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Fan Ye’s Book of Later Han (Houhanshu) is enormously important as China’s most complete work on Eastern Han history in biographical form. For the first time in any Western language, the author introduces Fan Ye’s magnificent writings in lively translation with rich annotation and informative and insightful commentary.
This first volume covers its early military history and highlights the lives and achievements of the twenty-eight generals who helped Emperor Guangwu unify China and establish the Eastern Han dynasty (Houhanshu, 15-22).
Also included are images of these twenty-eight founding fathers, maps, and information related to early Eastern Han systems.
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Drawing on Dunhuang manuscripts and the latest scholarship in Dunhuang and Buddhist Studies, this translation analyzes Buddhist monasticism via such topics as the organizational forms of Dunhuang Buddhist monasteries, the construction and operation of ordination platforms, ordination certificates and government ordination licenses, and meditation retreats, etc.
Assuming a pan-Asian perspective, the monograph also made trailblazing contributions to the study of Buddhist Sinicization and Sino-Indian cultural exchanges and is bound to exert long-lasting influences on the worldwide academic study of Buddhism.
How is it possible to write down the Japanese language exclusively in Chinese characters? And how are we then able to determine the language behind the veil of the Chinese script as Japanese? The history of writing in Japan presents us with a fascinating variety of writing styles ranging from phonography to morphography and all shades in between.
In Japanese Morphography: Deconstructing hentai kanbun, Gordian Schreiber shows that texts traditionally labelled as “hentai kanbun” or “variant Chinese” are, in fact, morphographically written Japanese texts instead and not just the result of an underdeveloped skill in Chinese. The study fosters our understanding of writing system typology beyond phonographic writing.
Grammatical Sketches of Japanese Dialects and Ryukyuan Languages
Volume Editor:
Japanese is definitely one of the best-known languages in typological literature. For example, typologists often assume that Japanese is a nominative-accusative language. However, it is often overlooked that Japanese, or more precisely, Tokyo Japanese, is just one of various local varieties of the Japonic language family (Japanese and Ryukyuan). In fact, the Japonic languages exhibit a surprising typological diversity. For example, some varieties display a split-intransitive as opposed to nominative-accusative system. The present volume is thus a unique attempt to explore the typological diversity of Japonic by providing a collection of grammatical sketches of various local varieties, four from Japanese dialects and five from Ryukyuan. Each grammatical sketch follows the same descriptive format, addressing a wide range of typological topics.
Inner Asia, with its rich culture, history, and natural resources, is now receiving increasing world attention following the post-communist geopolitical transformation of the region. Today, there is a burgeoning body of Inner Asian scholarship focusing on individual countries and peoples as well as the region as whole. Archives, once hidden, are at last becoming accessible, providing a wealth of new sources for in-depth research and reappraisal of the administrative, economic, political, religious and social configurations of the region – hence Brill’s Inner Asia Archive (BIAA). This new series recognizes the importance of these developments and encourages ongoing excavation of the emerging rich archival mines for new critical scholarship.

Forming a trio with the Inner Asia journal and Inner Asia Book Series, both associated with the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit (MIASU) at the University of Cambridge, Brill’s Inner Asia Archive provides an invaluable new platform for the collation and study of original archival sources from Inner Asia.

The series has published one volume since 2013.
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Taiwan Studies is a growing field with increasing influence. The series, founded by J. Bruce Jacobs†, is to publish high quality research which breaks new ground and/or gives new insights to Taiwan. Monographs and edited books from all disciplines, as well as cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research are welcomed. The editors of the series are also keen to see submissions of translated work, either directly or in scholarly methodology, that would welcome the Taiwan intellectual world into English. In addition to this, comparative research where Taiwan is an important component is also welcome. The series aims to reach academics, informed readers, as well as policy makers.
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The focus of this series is to gradually build a picture of the mental structure in China and East Asia. All volumes analyse the instances of affective experiences over a wide variety of Chinese or other East Asian texts from the same underlying database. The truly multi-disciplinary research method guarantees new and unexpected insights into the representation of the ‘mental-structure’ in Chinese and other East Asian societies from the angles of cultural anthropology, linguistics, psycholinguistics, literary criticism, history, and sociology. Aim of the series is, besides deepening our knowledge on the various shades of meaning in the imagery of the times, to reduce the subjectivity and cultural bias of researchers' analyses. The accompanying glossaries are invaluable reference material for any student of Chinese. This is an encyclopedic series.

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This series serves as a platform to promote East Asian maritime studies. The region’s dynamic economic development and complex history has sparked a lively debate amongst academics and policymakers struggling to maintain lasting peace and security in Pacific waters. While narrowing in on the impacts of international law in East Asian seas, the series also promotes a multi-disciplinary lens of the issue across several social sciences including international relations, economics, politics, strategic studies and law of the sea. The series aims to publish innovative works from leading scholars in the field.

Series Editor:
In today’s world characterized by freedom of movement and the uninhibited flow of ideas, there are unparalleled opportunities, not least in a scholarly context, to explore the rich diversity of East Asia. Essential to maximising such possibilities is an in-depth understanding of the trans-cultural networks that have shaped this region’s past. These networks have impacted on all levels of human activity, from language, travel, trade and religion to technology, medicine and art.
Much of this activity has until recently been masked by state-imposed borders and ideologies, but now a transnational perspective can help to bring into view the seminal roles played by key urban centres and hinterlands as hubs of such wider cultural networks - revealing their features, commonalities and new layers of contested meaning.
This series begins with a spotlight on the ancient port of Hakata (present-day Fukuoka), located on the edge of Japan, but once a centre of maritime trade in East Asia. The aim, therefore, is to create a platform to demonstrate how cultures and identities across East Asia have evolved and interacted over time, challenging many of the assumptions that have conditioned and confined our outlook and understanding in the past.