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Zhu Guangqian and Benedetto Croce on Aesthetic Thought

With a Translation of the Wenyi xinlixue 文藝心理學 (The Psychology of Art and Literature)

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Mario Sabattini

Edited by Elisa Levi Sabattini

In Zhu Guangqian and Benedetto Croce on Aesthetic Thought, Mario Sabattini analyses Croce’s influence on the aesthetic thought of Zhu Guangqian. Zhu Guangqian is one of the most representative figures of contemporary Chinese aesthetics. Since the '30s, he had an active role in China both on the literary and philosophical scenes, and, through his writings, he exerted an important influence in the moulding of numerous generations of intellectuals. Some of his works have been widely read, and they still provoke considerable interest in China, on the mainland as well as in Taiwan and Hong Kong. The volume also presents a revised translation of Zhu Guangqian’s Wenyi xinlixue (Psychology of Art and Literature).
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Edited by Ronald Holzhacker and Dafri Agussalim

The international community has come together to pursue certain fundamental, common goals over the coming period to 2030 to make progress toward ending poverty and hunger, improving social and economic well-being, preserving the environment and combating climate change, and maintaining peace. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been agreed to by states, which have in turn adopted national targets and action plans.
This volume studies the governance and implementation of these goals in Southeast Asia, in particular the difficulties in the shift from the international to the national, the multi-level challenges of implementation, and the involvement of stakeholders, civil society, and citizens in the process. Contributors to this volume are scholars from across Southeast Asia who research these issues in developing (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar), middle-income (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam), and developed countries (Brunei, Singapore) in the region. The perspectives on governance and the SDGs emerge from the fields of political science, international relations, geography, economics, law, health, and the natural sciences.
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Beyond Chinoiserie

Artistic Exchange between China and the West during the Late Qing Dynasty (1796-1911)

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Edited by Petra ten-Doesschate Chu and Jennifer Milam

The complex interweaving of different Western visions of China had a profound impact on artistic exchange between China and the West during the nineteenth century. Beyond Chinoiserie addresses the complexity of this exchange. While the playful Western “vision of Cathay” formed in the previous century continued to thrive, a more realistic vision of China was increasingly formed through travel accounts, paintings, watercolors, prints, book illustrations, and photographs. Simultaneously, the new discipline of sinology led to a deepening of the understanding of Chinese cultural history. Leading and emerging scholars in the fields of art history, literary studies and material culture, have authored the ten essays in this book, which deal with artistic relations between China and the West at a time when Western powers’ attempts to extend a sphere of influence in China led to increasingly hostile political interactions.
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The Other Greek

An Introduction to Chinese and Japanese Characters, Their History and Influence

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

In The Other Greek, Arthur Cooper offers a captivating and unorthodox introduction to the world of the Chinese script through the medium of poetry, explaining the structure, meaning and cultural significance of each character. Written nearly half a century ago, and now published posthumously, the book argues that the role of Chinese writing was analogous to the influence of Greek civilization on Western culture. Chinese is the Greek of the Far East, ‘the other Greek’! Originally a cryptanalyst, Cooper uses his professional—and distinctly non-academic—training to analyse Chinese characters and points out a series of unacknowledged associations between them. Ultimately, he aims to initiate the reader with no prior knowledge of the language into Chinese writing and poetry.
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Wan-Chun Huang

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One of China’s reality shows, Super Girl, showed too much of a ‘democratic’ idea for the taste of the Chinese Communist Party, which suspended it in 2006. Nevertheless, Super Girl succeeded in introducing a participatory audience and welcoming a new form of ‘affective economy’ that helped Chinese audiences actively engage in a given show. Today’s new media technologies and their convergence empower the participatory audience and spur democratic ideas in Chinese society. Because of these empowered audiences, China’s reality shows have become an influential platform. I examine four aspects of these Chinese reality shows in an era of ‘media convergence’: first, the new relationship between the Chinese government and media producers; second, the intense cooperation between Chinese new media producers and consumers; third, the public voice created by Chinese audiences in and outside the studio; and fourth, the limitations and possibilities of democratic participation in Chinese reality shows.

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Milan Ismangil

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In August 2016, Wings Gaming won the sixth edition of the International, a tournament for the videogame Dota 2. Wings Gaming, a team consisting of five Chinese players, was praised for bringing honour to China. This article explores various ways in which this Chinese Dota 2 community frames its fandom using nationalistic rhetoric. Teams identified as Chinese represent the country, honouring or disappointing the nation when they square off in tournaments. This article focusses on the everyday experience in this online community, arguing that the way in which people cheer for their teams stems from a nationalistic filter that makes nationalism the normative discourse in the community. A further comparison is made to American social media to discuss the role that truth plays when nationalism is discussed in the daily experience. This study concludes that a combination of factors surrounding the Chinese community creates a form of banal (cold) nationalism, which normalizes and strengthens national truths and myths.

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Rogier Creemers

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How does digital technology influence the Chinese state? This paper focuses on two elements that are rapidly transforming the modus operandi of governance. First, it argues that a strategic public-private nexus is forming at the heart of the Party-state, as an increasing symbiosis is developing between the huge private companies that dominate the Chinese internet and the political sphere. Second, it explores how new data-gathering and -processing capabilities, including ‘big data’, enhance its governing capabilities. Particular attention is given to the social credit system. Unsurprisingly, China’s control-oriented government sees this as an attractive opportunity to enhance its ability to monitor the activities of citizens, businesses, and government officials. These two developments, from a central point of view, may counter some of the perennial problems plaguing the Chinese state, including centre-periphery fragmentation and stunted information flows between government actors. Nevertheless, existing pathologies will likely be reproduced in the digital space.