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Korean Sinitic Poetry from Ancient Times to 1945: Si in the East offers a ground-breaking introduction to the oral performative aspect of Korean Sinitic poetry (hansi 漢詩). The anthology introduces 51 representative works of Korean Sinitic poetry from the 9th to early 20th century including 9 by women poets.
Each poem is discussed with ample notes on allusions and expressions, sounds and verbal glossing (hyŏnt’o), and commentaries that look beyond the geographical boundary of Korea.
Overview essays offer cultural and literary history in a broader East Asian context, and detailed linguistic guides emphasize the musicality and orality of this treasured literary tradition.
V. F. Minorsky and C. J. Edmonds Correspondence (1928-1965)
This volume is an annotated correspondence, of nearly forty years, between two prominent Orientalists. The letters cover a range of topics related to the Zagros Mountains, its peoples, their history, culture, and languages. They also offer a glimpse into the personal lives and careers of the two scholars, give valuable insights on the development of the field of Kurdish Studies, and to an extent outline the contours of what the two referred to as Zagrology.
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The Dynamic Essence of Transmedia Storytelling challenges many established truths about popular literary classics by presenting an analysis of sixty Korean variations of The Journey to the West, a set which includes novels and poems, as well as films, comics, paintings, and dance performances dating from the 14th century until today. In contrast to the typical assumption that literary classics like The Journey to the West are stable texts with a single original, Barbara Wall approaches The Journey to the West as a dynamic text comprised of all its variations. She argues that all the creators of such variations, from Korean scholars in the 14th century to “boy bands” like Seventeen in the 21st century, participate in the ongoing story world known as The Journey to the West.

Wall employs literary and quantitative analysis, ample graphic visualizations, and in-depth descriptions of classroom games to find new ways to understand the dynamics of transmedia storytelling and popular engagement with story worlds. Her approach opens new frontiers of intertextual analysis to literary scholars and teachers of literature who seek contemporary methods of introducing world literature to new generations of students.
Part of a formidable publishing industry, cheap yet eye-catching graphic narratives consistently charmed early modern Japanese readers for around two hundred years. These booklets were called kusazōshi (“grass books”).
Graphic Narratives from Early Modern Japan is the first English-language publication of its kind. It enables anyone new to kusazōshi to gain comprehensive knowledge of the field. For the specialist, our edited volume marks a turning point in scholarship, uncovering fresh research avenues.
While exploring the powerful effects of the visual-verbal imagination, this collection opens up bold new vistas on the act of reading and advances provocations around comics and manga.
Contributors are: Jaqueline Berndt, Joseph Bills, Michael Emmerich, Adam L. Kern, Fumiko Kobayashi, Frederick Feilden, Laura Moretti, Matsubara Noriko, Satō Satoru, Satō Yukiko, Satoko Shimazaki, Takagi Gen, Tanahashi Masahiro, Ellis Tinios, Tsuda Mayumi and, Glynne Walley.
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This collection of writings traces the evolution and revolution of Chinese modern education in the early twentieth century initiated by Cai Yuanpei (1868-1940), the first Minister of Education of the Republic of China, President of Peking University (1916-1927) and the founder of Academia Sinica.

This volume illustrates Cai Yuanpei’s educational thoughts, one of which is known as “freedom of thought and academic inclusiveness”(思想自由,兼容並包), through his own words from his political, social, and academic endeavors. Cai navigated the landscape of Chinese education at the time, bridging the gap between tradition and revolution, East and West, and setting the cornerstone of the Chinese modern education system. His innovative ideology remains significant in the context of Chinese education reforms in the 21st century.
This is the first book-length study of the roles played by the Manchu language at the center of the Qing empire at the height of its power in the eighteenth century.
It presents a revisionist account of Manchu not as a language in decline, but as extensively and consciously used language in a variety of areas.
It treats the use, discussion, regulation, and philological study of Manchu at the court of an emperor who cared deeply for the maintenance and history of the language of his dynasty.