Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 793 items for :

  • New Testament & Early Christian Writings x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Author:
In this work, Jeehei Park proposes Greek and Roman cosmopolitanism as a constructive category through which to navigate a reading of human diversity and communal unity in Paul’s letters. Park takes a thorough look at the cosmopolitan ideas of Diogenes of Sinope, Philo, Plutarch, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius to establish Paul as an interlocutor who critically participated in the discourse of cosmopolitanism. Park characterizes Paul’s understanding of unity with the distinctive phrase “heterogeneous unity,” in which human differences are respected and embraced rather than being universalized or homogenized. This book offers a novel analysis of Paul’s rhetoric about citizenship in Philippians and its adoption of Greek and Roman cosmopolitanism as an interpretive contour.
This volume focuses on Christianity in Attica and its metropolis, Athens, from Paul’s initial visit in the first century up to the closing of the philosophical schools under the reign of Justinian I in the sixth century. Underscoring the relevance of epigraphic resources and the importance of methodological sophistication in analysing especially archaeological evidence, it readdresses many questions on the basis of a larger body of evidence and aims to combine literary, epigraphic, and archaeological evidence in order to create the outlines of a narrative of the rise and development of Christianity in the area. It is the first interdisciplinary study on the local history of Christianity in the area.
Author:
This book addresses the dearth of study in Lukan scholarship on the transfiguration account and provides a model of new exodus based on the Song of the Sea (Exod 15) beyond the two major—Deuteronomi(sti)c and Isaianic—models. The proposed Exodus 15 pattern explicates the enigmatic phrase “his ‘exodus’ in Jerusalem” in the transfiguration account. It also elucidates how the seemingly discordant motifs of Moses and David are conjoined within a larger drama of the (new) exodus and the subsequent establishment of Israel’s (eschatological) worship space. This shows how Luke deals with the issues of temple (Acts 7), circumcision (Acts 15), and the ambivalent nature of Jerusalem.
Why do questions of purity play a minor role in the New Testament when the majority of the texts are of Jewish origin and character? To answer this question, the present study analyses the forming of identity as a central function to purity in ancient Jewish sources. Using the theory of social identity according to Henri Taijfel and John Turner, Milena Hasselmann examined the importance of purity texts in the New Testament and in other ancient Jewish sources for the construction of social identity. On a broad basis of sources and with the help of Hebrew-language literature, which is little received in the German and English-language scientific context, it becomes a meaningful picture that places the purity texts of the New Testament in its wider environment. In doing so, she shows that the New Testament's handling of questions of purity is to be seen in continuity rather than discontinuity with other ancient traditions.

Warum nehmen Reinheitsfragen einen verhältnismäßig geringen Stellenwert im Neuen Testament ein, wenn die Texte mehrheitlich jüdischen Ursprungs und jüdischer Prägung sind? Dieser Frage geht die vorliegende Studie nach und setzt zu ihrer Beantwortung bei einer zentralen Funktion, die Reinheit in anderen antiken jüdischen Quellen zukommt, ein: Reinheitsbestimmungen sind identitätsstiftend. Mit der Theorie der Sozialen Identität nach Henri Tajfel und John Turner untersucht Milena Hasselmann, welche Bedeutung Reinheitstexte im Neuen Testament und in anderen antikjüdischen Quellen für die Konstruktion sozialer Identität haben. Auf einer breiten Quellenbasis und unter Hinzuziehung hebräischsprachiger Literatur, die im deutsch- und englischsprachigem Wissenschaftskontext wenig rezipiert wird, entwirft sie ein aussagekräftiges Bild, das die Reinheitstexte des Neuen Testament in dessen weitere Umwelt einordnet. Sie zeigt damit, dass der neutestamentliche Umgang mit Reinheitsfragen in Kontinuität zu anderen antiken Traditionen zu sehen ist.
Volume Editors: , , and
This volume contains fifteen essays in honor of L. Michael White, whose work has been influential in exploring the social histories of ancient Jews and Christians within the Graeco-Roman world. Following an introduction that highlights some of White’s main scholarly contributions, the essays are grouped into three topic areas: Paul and his Legacy, Social Relations, and Material Culture. The essays are united by an interest in reconstructing the social worlds of ancient Jews and Christians through careful analysis of literary sources and material culture in their most precise ancient contexts.
Have you ever wondered why Paul leaves the resurrection discussion in 1 Corinthians 15 for the end of the letter? Have you pondered how 1 Corinthians 15 functions as the climax to 1 Corinthians? This book answers those questions by exploring insinuatio, the Greco-Roman rhetorical convention used to address prejudiced or controversial topics—like resurrection—at the end of a discourse. This is the most thorough treatment of insinuatio in Biblical and Classical studies to date. It examines the Greco-Roman rhetorical handbooks and speeches on insinuatio, compares them to what Paul does in 1 Corinthians 15, and finds that this was precisely Paul’s rhetorical strategy in 1 Corinthians.
Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum designed in the 1960s as a structured set of handbooks on ‘matters Jewish’ illuminating the origins of Christianity, has evolved into a series of monographs and collective works on the history and literature of Jews and Christians under Roman rule. Combining expertise in Jewish, Christian, and Roman literature and history, the series aims at covering Qumranic, Graeco-Jewish, early Christian, and rabbinic sources. The classic ‘historical introduction’ published in the two volumes of The Jewish People in the First Century (1974-76) will be complemented by a number of volumes debating historiographical axioms and methods and presenting a selection of sources and a ‘joint history’ of Jews and Christians in the first and second centuries CE. Apart from the volumes planned by the editors, other publication proposals will be taken into consideration. With all these updates in methodology, the series proudly continues the pioneering work set in motion by its founders half a century ago.

Board of Editors: Shaye Cohen (Harvard University), Matthijs den Dulk (Radboud University Nijmegen), David Goodblatt (University of California at San Diego), Christine Hayes (Yale University), Richard Kalmin (Jewish Theological Seminary of America), Karl-Wilhelm Niebuhr (University of Jena), Pieter van der Horst (Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences), Huub van de Sandt (University of Tilburg), James VanderKam (University of Notre Dame). General Editors: Joshua Schwartz (Bar-Ilan University) and Peter Tomson (University of Leuven).

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
(Arbeiten zur Geschichte des antiken Judentums und des Urchristentums)
Ancient Judaism & Early Christianity began in 1976, as Arbeiten zur Geschichte des antiken Judentums und des Urchristentums with the publication of M. Hengel's Die Zeloten. The series, which includes monographs and collections of essays, covers a range of topics, typically focusing on areas of mutual influence or points of controversy between Judaism and Christianity in the first centuries CE. Recent titles published in the series have included important studies of Josephus, of the Jewish background of Paul's writings, and of the historical Jesus within his Jewish context.

The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last 5 years.
New Testament Tools, Studies, and Documents combines two series: New Testament Tools and Studies and Studies and Documents. The former was founded by Bruce M. Metzger in 1965 and edited by him until 1993, when Bart D. Ehrman joined him as co-editor. The latter series was founded by Kirsopp and Silva Lake in 1935, edited by them until the death of Kirsopp Lake in 1946, then briefly by Silva Lake and Carsten Høeg (1955), followed by Jacob Geerlings (until 1969), by Irving Alan Sparks (until 1993), and finally by Eldon Jay Epp (until 2007).

The new series will promote the publication of primary sources, reference tools, and critical studies that advance the understanding of the New Testament and other early Christian writings and writers into the fourth century. Emphases of the two predecessor series have been retained, including the textual history and transmission of the New Testament and related literature, relevant manuscripts in various languages, and methodologies for research in early Christianity. The series will also publish a broader range of studies pertinent to early Christianity and its writings.

The series published an average of 2,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.