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Volume Editors: Beate Kowalski and Susan Docherty
The account of the exodus of the Israelite slaves from Egypt under Moses has shaped the theology and community identity of both Jews and Christians across the centuries. Its reception in later scriptures and religious writings, as well as in art and music, continues to inspire liberation movements across the globe. This volume brings together an international group of scholars to explore the re-use of the exodus narratives across a wide range of early Jewish and Christian literature including the Apocrypha and the New Testament. The contributors engage with wider questions of methodology and the impact of social and cultural context on biblical interpretation.
Volume Editors: Timo Nisula, Anni Maria Laato, and Pablo Irizar
Religious Polemics and Encounters in Late Antiquity: Boundaries, Conversions, and Persuasion explores the intricate identity formation and negotiations of early encounters of the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). It explores the ever-pressing challenges arising from polemical inter-religious encounters by analyzing the dynamics of apologetic debate, the negotiation and formation of boundaries of belonging, and the argumentative thrust for persuasion and conversion, as well as the outcomes of these various encounters, including the articulation of novel ideas. The Late Antique authors studied in the present volume represent a variety of voices from North Africa, passing through Rome, to Palestine. Together, these voices of the past offer invaluable insight to shape the present times, in hope for a better future.
The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke introduces the world of the ancient fable to biblical scholarship and argues that Jesus’s parables in Luke’s gospel belong to the ancient fable tradition.
Jesus is regarded as the first figure in history to use the parable genre with any regularity—a remarkable historical curiosity that serves as the foundation for many assumptions in New Testament scholarship. The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke challenges this consensus, situating the parables within a literary context unknown to biblical scholarship: the ancient fable. After introducing the ancient fable, the “parables” of Jesus in Luke’s gospel are used as a testing ground to demon - strate that they are identical to first-century fables. This challenges many conven - tional assumptions about parables, Luke’s gospel, and the relationship of Jesus to the storytelling traditions of the Mediterranean world. This study offers multitudes of new parallels to the otherwise enigmatic parable tradition, opens an exciting new venue for comparative exploration, and lays a new foundation upon which to study the fables of Jesus.
Ritual Failure and Theological Innovation in Early Christianity
Author: Peter-Ben Smit
In Felix culpa: Ritual Failure and Theological Innovation in Early Christianity, Peter-Ben Smit argues that ritual developments were key to the development of early Christianity. Focusing on rituals that go wrong, he shows precisely how ritual infelicities are a catalyst for reflection upon ritual and their development in terms of their performance as well as the meaning attributed to them. Smit discusses texts from the Pauline epistles and the Gospel of Mark, and provides a chapter on Philo of Alexandria by way of contextualization in the Greco-Roman world. By stressing the importance of ritual, the present book invites a reconsideration of all too doctrinally focused approaches to early Christian communities and identities. It also highlights the embodied and performative character of what being in Christ amounted to two millennia ago.
Ancient Judaism & Early Christianity Online is the electronic version of Ancient Judaism & Early Christianity. Ancient Judaism & Early Christianity began in 1976, as Arbeiten zur Geschichte des antiken Judentums und des Urchristentums, with the publication of M. Hengel's Die Zeloten. The series, which includes monographs and collections of essays, covers a range of topics, typically focusing on areas of mutual influence or points of controversy between Judaism and Christianity in the first centuries CE. Recent titles published in the series have included important studies of Josephus, of the Jewish background of Paul's writings, and of the historical Jesus within his Jewish context.

Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum designed in the 1960s as a structured set of handbooks on ‘matters Jewish’ illuminating the origins of Christianity, has evolved into a series of monographs and collective works on the history and literature of Jews and Christians under Roman rule. Combining expertise in Jewish, Christian, and Roman literature and history, the series aims at covering Qumranic, Graeco-Jewish, early Christian, and rabbinic sources. The classic ‘historical introduction’ published in the two volumes of The Jewish People in the First Century (1974-76) will be complemented by a number of volumes debating historiographical axioms and methods and presenting a selection of sources and a ‘joint history’ of Jews and Christians in the first and second centuries CE. Apart from the volumes planned by the editors, other publication proposals will be taken into consideration. With all these updates in methodology, the series proudly continues the pioneering work set in motion by its founders half a century ago.

Board of Editors: Friedrich Avemarie † (University of Marburg), Shaye J.D. Cohen (Harvard University), David Goodblatt (University of California at San Diego), Christine Hayes (Yale University), Richard Kalmin (Jewish Theological Seminary of America), Karl-Wilhelm Niebuhr (University of Jena), Pieter van der Horst (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences), Huub van de Sandt (Tilburg University), James VanderKam (University of Notre Dame).

General Editors: Joshua J. Schwartz (Bar-Ilan University), Peter J. Tomson (KU Leuven).
This first online collection of New Testament Tools, Studies, and Documents (NTTSD) combines two series, New Testament Tools and Studies (NTTS) and Studies and Documents (SD). The former was founded by Bruce M. Metzger in 1965 and edited by him until 1993, when Bart D. Ehrman joined him as co-editor. The latter series was founded by Kirsopp and Silva Lake in 1935, edited by them until the death of Kirsopp Lake in 1946, then briefly by Silva Lake and Carsten Høeg (1955), followed by Jacob Geerlings (until 1969), by Irving Alan Sparks (until 1993), and finally by Eldon Jay Epp (until 2007).

The new series promotes the publication of primary sources, reference tools, and critical studies that advance the understanding of the New Testament and other early Christian writings and writers into the fourth century. Emphases of the two predecessor series is retained, including the textual history and transmission of the New Testament and related literature, relevant manuscripts in various languages, and methodologies for research in early Christianity. The series also publishes a broader range of studies pertinent to early Christianity and its writings. The collection contains volumes 1 to 61.
Supplements to Novum Testamentum publishes monographs and collections of essays that make original contributions to the field of New Testament studies. This includes text-critical, philological and exegetical studies, and investigations which seek to situate early Christian texts (both canonical and non-canonical) and theology in the broader context of Jewish and Graeco-Roman history, culture, religion and literature.
Author: Gordon Fee
Editor: Eldon Jay Epp
Bodmer Papyri, Scribal Culture, and Textual Transmission presents a collection of Gordon Fee’s seminal works on New Testament textual criticism. His meticulous and thorough examination of New Testament papyrus Bodmer P66 (1968) insightfully describes its textual character and significant relationship to P75 and other early manuscripts. P66 and P75, among our most important and earliest papyri, were published only a half-dozen years before Fee’s volume, which has been heavily used and influential ever since. Prominent is his discovery of scribal activity in P66 that tended to correct its text toward the Byzantine. Fee’s ten successive, often quoted articles contribute substantially to our understanding of textual transmission and text-critical methodology, with an emphasis also on patristic citations. Completed with ample bibliographical resources, this volume is an indispensable resource for future research.

Distinguished book reviewers wrote about Fee (1968): “full scale study” (Kilpatrick); “definitive analysis” (Metzger); “a most valuable work, ... which greatly advances the discipline of textual criticism in knowledge and method” (Birdsall).
Linguistic Signs, the Process of Signification, and the Hermeneutics of Discursive Resistance
Author: Timo Eskola
Focusing on linguistic signs, New Testament Semiotics navigates through different realist and nominalist traditions. From this perspective, Saussure’s and Peirce’s traditions exhibit similarities. Questioning Derrida’s and Eco’s semiotics based on their misuse of Peirce’s innovations, Dr. Privatdozent Timo Eskola rehabilitates Benveniste and Ricoeur. A sign is about conditions and functions. Sign as a role is a manifestation of participation. Serving as a sign entails participation in a web of relations, participation in a network of meanings, and adoption of a set of rules. We should focus on sentences and networks, not primitive reference or binary oppositions. Enunciations are postulations producing evanescent meanings. Finally, the study suggests a linguistic approach to metatheology that is based on hermeneutics of discursive resistance.